Graduate Students

Estela Bernice Diaz

Estela Bernice Diaz

UNI: 
ebd2129
ebd2129@columbia.edu
Estela
Diaz
Department: 
Sociology
Areas of Interest: 
Gender, Sexuality, Education, Queer Theory, Inequalities
Education: 

B.A. in Sociology with Honors, Certificate in Gender and Sexuality Studies, Princeton University (2014)

Biographical Note: 

Estela Bernice Diaz is a doctoral student and Paul F. Lazarsfeld Fellow at Columbia University. She is also a National Science Foundation (NSF) GRFP Fellow, and Mellon Mays Undergraduate Fellow. Her current research interests include gender and sexuality, early childhood education, queer theory, and social inequality. Prior to beginning her doctoral studies, Estela organized an interdisciplinary conference with Princeton’s Office of Religious Life on “Poverty and Peacemaking,” structured around a series of roundtables with diplomats, religious leaders, scholars, philanthropists, artists, and students. She then worked as an undergraduate admissions officer at Princeton University for two years. Originally from Los Angeles, Estela received her B.A. in Sociology with a certificate in gender and sexuality studies from Princeton University in 2014. 

Publications: 

"Sex-y Space: Space and Sexual Communities in the Bay Area and Pioneer Valley, 1960-1980" 

Mellon Mays Undergraduate Fellowship Journal 2013

Cohort Year: 

Daniel Tadmon

Daniel Tadmon

Department: 
Sociology
Room: 
Knox 608

Greer Mellon

Greer Mellon

gcf2106@columbia.edu
Greer
Mellon
Department: 
Sociology
Areas of Interest: 
sociology of education, economic sociology, labor markets, inequality
Education: 

M.Phil. in Development Studies, University of Oxford; B.A. (magna cum laude) Columbia University

Katharine (Kate) Khanna

Katharine (Kate) Khanna

knk2121@columbia.edu
Department: 
Sociology
Room: 
Knox Hall 616
Areas of Interest: 
Social Inequality; Gender; Cultural Sociology
Education: 

B.A. Anthropology & French Studies, honors, Brown University (2013)

Biographical Note: 

Kate Khanna is a Ph.D. Candidate in the Department of Sociology at Columbia University. She is a Paul F. Lazarsfeld Fellow at Columbia and a National Science Foundation (NSF) GRFP Fellow. Her research interests include social inequality, gender, cultural sociology, identity, and social movements.

Kate holds a B.A. in Anthropology & French Studies with Honors and magna cum laude from Brown University, where she conducted research on the way adolescents use gendered language and its implications for gender socialization. In her honors thesis, she showed how female high school students use and are described by others using a broader range of gendered terms than male students. Her analysis argued that norms of masculinity deter male high school students from using "feminine" terms, demonstrating how masculine is coded as "good" and feminine is coded as "bad."

Prior to beginning her doctoral studies, Kate worked as Research Associate at the Institute for Community Health in Boston and was a Research Assistant in the Department of Sociology at Wellesley College.

Cohort Year: 

Ryan Hagen

Ryan Hagen

rah2168@columbia.edu
Ryan
Hagen
Areas of Interest: 
Organizations, Risk, Sociology of Knowledge, Historical Sociology, Economic Sociology
Biographical Note: 

Ryan Hagen is a doctoral student in the Department of Sociology at Columbia University. His primary interest is how organizations encounter non-market risk. He also conducted an historical project on how the political structure of the post-Redemption Southern United States shaped collective violence in the region at the end of the 19th and opening of the 20th centuries. He holds a BA in English and American Literature from New York University, and an MA in Sociology from Columbia University.

Publications: 

(2016) "The Course of Law: State Intervention in Southern Lynch Mob Violence
1882–1930." Makovi, K., R. Hagen and P. Bearman. Sociological Science 3,
860-888, September 2016.

(2013) “The Influence of Political Dynamics on Southern Lynch Mob Formation
and Lethality.” Hagen, R., K. Makovi and P. Bearman. Social Forces 92(2)
757-787, December 2013.

(2013) Encyclopedia of Crisis Management. Penuel, Bradley K., M. Statler, and R.
Hagen, eds. Thousand Oaks, CA: SAGE.

(2013) “Structural Secrecy.” In Encyclopedia of Crisis Management. Penuel,
Bradley K., M. Statler, and R. Hagen, eds. Thousand Oaks, CA: SAGE.

(2011) “Maritime Piracy, 1979 to the Present.” In Encyclopedia of Disaster Relief.
Penuel, Bradley K., and M. Statler, eds. Thousand Oaks, CA: SAGE.

Cohort Year: 

Abel Ravasz

Abel Ravasz

UNI: 
ar3351
Abel
Ravasz

Hashim Rashid

Hashim Rashid

UNI: 
hr2353
Hashim
Rashid

Khosnur Alam

Khosnur Alam

UNI: 
ka2490
fa2224@columbia.edu
Khosnur
Alam

Elyssa Carr

Elyssa Carr

UNI: 
ec2960
fa2224@columbia.edu
Elyssa
Carr

Lin Chen

Lin Chen

UNI: 
lc2960
fa2224@columbia.edu
Lin
Chen
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