Ph.D. Students

Jonathan Hallegua Cleveland

Jonathan Hallegua Cleveland

UNI: 
jc2457
Jonathan
Cleveland
Paul F. Lazarsfeld Fellow
Department: 
Sociology
Areas of Interest: 
Corpus Lingusitics, Sociology of Time, Historical Sociology

Eugene Grey

Eugene Grey

Department: 
Sociology

Estela Bernice Diaz

Estela Bernice Diaz

UNI: 
ebd2129
ebd2129@columbia.edu
Estela
Diaz
Department: 
Sociology
Areas of Interest: 
Gender, Sexuality, Education, Queer Theory, Inequalities
Education: 

B.A. in Sociology with Honors, Certificate in Gender and Sexuality Studies, Princeton University (2014)

Biographical Note: 

Estela Bernice Diaz is a doctoral student and Paul F. Lazarsfeld Fellow at Columbia University. She is also a National Science Foundation (NSF) GRFP Fellow, and Mellon Mays Undergraduate Fellow. Her current research interests include gender and sexuality, early childhood education, queer theory, and social inequality. Prior to beginning her doctoral studies, Estela organized an interdisciplinary conference with Princeton’s Office of Religious Life on “Poverty and Peacemaking,” structured around a series of roundtables with diplomats, religious leaders, scholars, philanthropists, artists, and students. She then worked as an undergraduate admissions officer at Princeton University for two years. Originally from Los Angeles, Estela received her B.A. in Sociology with a certificate in gender and sexuality studies from Princeton University in 2014. 

Publications: 

"Sex-y Space: Space and Sexual Communities in the Bay Area and Pioneer Valley, 1960-1980" 

Mellon Mays Undergraduate Fellowship Journal 2013

Cohort Year: 

Daniel Tadmon

Daniel Tadmon

Department: 
Sociology
Room: 
Knox 608

Francisco Lara-Garcia

Francisco Lara-Garcia

UNI: 
fl2451
fl2451@columbia.edu
Francisco
Lara Garcia (Lara-Garcia)
Department: 
Sociology
Room: 
Knox 506
Areas of Interest: 
Migration, Urbanization, Sociology of Knowledge, Race/Ethnicity, Borderlands, Mexico
Biographical Note: 

Francisco Lara-García (also Lara García) is a PHD Student in the Sociology Department. Prior to coming to Columbia, he received a Master's in Urban Planning from Harvard University and a B.A. in Political Science, Sociology and Latin American Studies at the University of Arizona. Francisco also spent two years teaching bilingual 5th grade as a Teach For America Corps Member in Southern Texas.

Publications: 

Book Chapters:

Lara-Garcia, F., and Sim, A. (2013). “El modelo de Naciones Unidas en Arizona: una experiencia en educación y cooperación binacional en la frontera entre Sonora y Arizona”. In G. Córdova Bojórquez, J. Dutram Hansen, B. Lara E, & J. G. Rodríguez Gutiérrez (Eds.), Desarrollo humano transfronterizo : retos y oportunidades en la región Sonora-Arizona (pp. 295-309): El Colegio de Sonora : Universidad de Sonora : Universidad Estatal de Sonora: El Colegio de la Frontera Norte.

Reports:

Davis, Diane, Nélida Escobedo, Fernando Granados, Francisco Lara-Garcia, David Schoen, and Margaret Scott. (2016). Case Study Compendium: Understanding the Barriers and Enablers to Densification at the Metropolitan Level. Qualitative Evidence from Seven Mexican Cities, Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Graduate School of Design.

Thesis:

Lara-García, F. (2016).“¿Te Vas o Te Quedas?: Variations in Explanations for Housing Abandonment in Tijuana, Mexico. Harvard University. Department of Urban Planning and Design. Thesis submitted for the Master of Urban Planning.

Thesis Available at: http://bit.ly/2n0DABX

Cohort Year: 

Nicholas Aaron Pang

Nicholas Aaron Pang

UNI: 
nap2155
nap2155@columbia.edu
Nicholas
Pang
Department: 
Sociology
Areas of Interest: 
Race and Ethnicity, Social Movements, Political Sociology, Historical Sociology
Education: 

B.A. Sociology & East Asian Studies, magna cum laude, Princeton University

Cohort Year: 

Terrell Frazier

Terrell Frazier

tf2292@columbia.edu
Terrell
Frazier
Areas of Interest: 
Political Sociology, Collective Action and Social Movements, Social Networks, Social Stratification
Biographical Note: 

Terrell Frazier is a Ph.D. student in Sociology and a Paul F. Lazarsfeld Fellow at Columbia University. He is also a 2016 Robert Wood Johnson Foundation Health Policy Research Scholar. His research interests include political sociology, social movements, social networks, organizations, race and ethnicity, gender and sexuality and stratification and inequality.

His current research—a study of activist network structures in New York City—investigates the relationship between social movement actors’ social positions and their capacities for strategic action. His research also examines health and disease at the intersections of identity, social position and processes of advantage and disadvantage, to illuminate both the etiology of health disparities in marginalized communities and the relationship between the social patterning of disease and the patterning of related social movements.

Prior to joining the Sociology department Terrell completed his M.A. in African American Studies at Columbia, where he has also worked as a researcher at the Interdisciplinary Center for Innovative Theory and Empirics (INCITE). He received a B.A. in Social Relations & Policy and Journalism from Michigan State University.

Greer Mellon

Greer Mellon

gcf2106@columbia.edu
Greer
Mellon
Department: 
Sociology
Areas of Interest: 
sociology of education, economic sociology, labor markets, inequality
Education: 

M.Phil. in Development Studies, University of Oxford; B.A. (magna cum laude) Columbia University

Katharine (Kate) Khanna

Katharine (Kate) Khanna

knk2121@columbia.edu
Department: 
Sociology
Room: 
Knox Hall 616
Areas of Interest: 
Social Inequality; Gender; Cultural Sociology
Education: 

B.A. Anthropology & French Studies, honors, Brown University (2013)

Biographical Note: 

Kate Khanna is a Ph.D. Candidate in the Department of Sociology at Columbia University. She is a Paul F. Lazarsfeld Fellow at Columbia and a National Science Foundation (NSF) GRFP Fellow. Her research interests include social inequality, gender, cultural sociology, identity, and social movements.

Kate holds a B.A. in Anthropology & French Studies with Honors and magna cum laude from Brown University, where she conducted research on the way adolescents use gendered language and its implications for gender socialization. In her honors thesis, she showed how female high school students use and are described by others using a broader range of gendered terms than male students. Her analysis argued that norms of masculinity deter male high school students from using "feminine" terms, demonstrating how masculine is coded as "good" and feminine is coded as "bad."

Prior to beginning her doctoral studies, Kate worked as Research Associate at the Institute for Community Health in Boston and was a Research Assistant in the Department of Sociology at Wellesley College.

Cohort Year: 

Martin Barnay

Martin Barnay

Martin
Barnay
Department: 
Sociology
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