Ph.D. Students

Anna Patricia Hidalgo

Anna Patricia Hidalgo

UNI: 
aph2144
aph2144@columbia.edu
Anna
Hidalgo
Department: 
Sociology
Room: 
Knox Hall 709
Education: 

M.A. Sociology, Columbia University, 2016

B.A. History,  Brown University, 2009

Biographical Note: 

Anna is a doctoral student in the Department of Sociology at Columbia University. She is a Paul F. Lazarsfeld Fellow at Columbia, a Ford Foundation Predoctoral Fellow, a National Science Foundation (NSF) GRFP Fellow, and a Mellon Mays Fellow.

Prior to beginning her doctoral studies, Anna worked with the CDC’s National HIV Behavioral Surveillance Study, and was a Senior Research Assistant with the NIH Adolescent Trials Network at The Fenway Institute.

Publications: 

White Hughto JM, Hidalgo A, Bazzi A, Reisner S, Mimiaga M. 2016. "Indicators of HIV-risk resilience among men who have sex with men: A content analysis of online profiles." Sexual Health 13: 436-443.

Cohort Year: 

Kathleen Griesbach

Kathleen Griesbach

kag2182@columbia.edu
Kathleen
Griesbach
Department: 
Sociology
Education: 

 

Biographical Note: 

Kathleen Griesbach is a PhD student in Sociology and a Paul F. Lazarsfeld Fellow at Columbia University with interests in labor, migration, borders, race and ethnicity, and inequality.  

Kathleen holds a B.A. in English and Latin American Studies from New York University and an M.A. in Latin American Studies and International Migration from UC San Diego, where she conducted research in the U.S. and Mexico and co-authored a publication with the Mexican Migration Field Research Program. For her M.A. thesis she conducted ethnographic research on immigration enforcement and detention in North Carolina and southern California, including 32 qualitative interviews and work with nonprofits in both regions, and published some of her findings in the academic journal Norteamérica.

Kathleen lived and worked in Madrid, Spain as a Fulbright English Teaching Assistant from 2011-2012. Prior to coming to Columbia, she worked as a paralegal and outreach advocate for a legal aid organization in the Rio Grande Valley border region of Texas. Her research interests on the experiences of migrant agricultural workers, U.S. labor and immigration history, and precarious work are deeply informed by the people she met and worked with in south Texas.   

Publications: 

Griesbach, Kathleen. “Local-Federal Immigration Enforcement in North Carolina: Mapping the Criminal-Immigration Overlap” (Article). Norteamerica: Revista Académica del CISAN-UNAM. Immigration to the Southeastern United States. Year 6, Special Issue, 2011.

Griesbach, Kathleen. “Southern States” (Encyclopedia Entry). In Undocumented Immigrants in the United States Today: An Encyclopedia of Their Experiences. Ed. Anna Ochoa O’Leary. Westbrook: ABC-CLIO-Greenwood, 2014.   

García, Angela, Griesbach, Kathleen, Andrade, Jessica, González, Yrizar Barbosa, Guillermo. “Pressure from the Inside: The Effects of State-Level Immigration Policies for Tlacuitapenses in Oklahoma and California” (Book Chapter). In Recession without Borders: Mexican Migrants Confront the Economic Downturn edited by David FitzGerald, Rafael Alarcon, and Leah Muse-Orlinoff. La Jolla, CA and Boulder, CO: CCIS and Lynne Rienner Publishers, February 2011.

Griesbach, Kathleen. “A Program at Odds with Federal Immigration Powers” (Op-Ed). The Raleigh News & Observer, Sept 9, 2010.

Cohort Year: 

Adrianna Marie Bagnall

Adrianna Marie Bagnall

UNI: 
amb2336
amb2336@columbia.edu
Adrianna
Bagnall
Department: 
Sociology
Room: 
608
Areas of Specialty: 
Historical Sociology, Disability Policy, Expertise
Biographical Note: 

Adrianna Bagnall studied Special Education, Psychology, and Sociology in her undergradute education at Seattle Pacific University where she cultivated an interest in disability policy. She completed her masters' degree in Sociology at Columbia University in 2013. Her masters' research focused on autism policy and local government organization around developmental disability in NYC. 

She is currently researching the historical development of services and policy for adults with developmental disability. Her methods include ethnographic observation, contemporary and historical interviews, and historical document analysis. She is also currently conducting research on the transition out of high school for youth in special education as a participant in the Disability Determination Process Small Grant Program for graduate level researchers. 

Cohort Year: 

Mark Anthony Hoffman

Mark Anthony Hoffman

UNI: 
mh3279
mh3279@columbia.edu
Mark
Hoffman
Department: 
Sociology
Biographical Note: 

Mark Hoffman is a PhD candidate in the Department of Sociology at Columbia University. His interests include networks, time, historical sociology and economic sociology.  He holds a BA from NYU Abu Dhabi.

Cohort Year: 

Ryan Hagen

Ryan Hagen

rah2168@columbia.edu
Ryan
Hagen
Areas of Interest: 
Organizations, Risk, Sociology of Knowledge, Historical Sociology, Economic Sociology
Biographical Note: 

Ryan Hagen is a doctoral student in the Department of Sociology at Columbia University. His primary interest is how organizations encounter non-market risk. He also conducted an historical project on how the political structure of the post-Redemption Southern United States shaped collective violence in the region at the end of the 19th and opening of the 20th centuries. He holds a BA in English and American Literature from New York University, and an MA in Sociology from Columbia University.

Publications: 

(2016) "The Course of Law: State Intervention in Southern Lynch Mob Violence
1882–1930." Makovi, K., R. Hagen and P. Bearman. Sociological Science 3,
860-888, September 2016.

(2013) “The Influence of Political Dynamics on Southern Lynch Mob Formation
and Lethality.” Hagen, R., K. Makovi and P. Bearman. Social Forces 92(2)
757-787, December 2013.

(2013) Encyclopedia of Crisis Management. Penuel, Bradley K., M. Statler, and R.
Hagen, eds. Thousand Oaks, CA: SAGE.

(2013) “Structural Secrecy.” In Encyclopedia of Crisis Management. Penuel,
Bradley K., M. Statler, and R. Hagen, eds. Thousand Oaks, CA: SAGE.

(2011) “Maritime Piracy, 1979 to the Present.” In Encyclopedia of Disaster Relief.
Penuel, Bradley K., and M. Statler, eds. Thousand Oaks, CA: SAGE.

Cohort Year: 

Dialika Sall

Dialika Sall

UNI: 
ds3276
ds3276@columbia.edu
Dialika
Sall
Department: 
Sociology
Biographical Note: 

Dialika Sall is a Ph.D student in Sociology and a Paul F. Lazarsfeld Fellow at Columbia University. Her research interests include racial and ethnic inequality, education, urban poverty and immigration. She's currently studying identity negotiations among the children of West African immigrants in New York City. Dialika is also the recipient of the 2015 National Science Foundation (NSF) Graduate Research Fellowship.

Prior to Columbia, Dialika graduated from Pomona College in 2012 with a B.A. in Sociology. Her senior thesis examined the work experiences of Senegalese hair braiders in New York City and Atlanta, Georgia. After Pomona College, Dialika worked with Americorps as a City Year Chicago tutor and mentor to ninth graders at Harper High School.

Publications: 

Sall, Dialika and Shamus Khan. 2016. What Elite Theory Should Have Learned, and Can Still Learn, From W.E.B. DuBois. Ethnic and Racial Studies http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/01419870.2017.1248999.

Cohort Year: 

Lisa Lucile Owens

Lisa Lucile Owens

UNI: 
llo2111
llo2111@columbia.edu
Lisa Lucile
Owens
Areas of Interest: 
Sociology of Law, Deviance & Social Control, SKAT, Privacy & Surveillance
Biographical Note: 

 

Lisa is a 4th year Ph.D. student and Paul F. Lazarsfeld Fellow at Columbia University. 

Lisa holds both a J.D.  and an LL.M., and is a member of the Massachusetts state bar.  Prior to beginning her Ph.D., Lisa worked at the Harvard Management Company and the United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees.  She served previously as the Director of Public Affairs for the State of Alabama at Planned Parenthood of Alabama.

Journal Publications:

Coerced Parenthood as Family Policy: Feminism, the Moral Agency of Women, and Men's "Right to Choose"Alabama Civil Rights & Civil Liberties Law Review (2013).

Other Publications:

Justice and Warfare in Cyberspace, The Boston Review (2015)

The Vultures of Wall Street: The Financial Firms that Prey on Sovereign Debt, The Boston Review (2014).  Co-authored with Saskia Sassen.  


Cohort Year: 

Jonathan Lin

Jonathan Lin

UNI: 
jl4169
jl4169@columbia.edu
Jonathan
Lin
Biographical Note: 

Jonathan Lin received his Bachelor of Arts in Sociology from CUNY Brooklyn College with a minor in history. His undergraduate studies focused on Immigration, education, and labor, with an emphasis on East Asian communities in New York. His undergraduate thesis dealt with second generation values among the Chinese community in New York City, and how parental values and expectations influence second generation education and career choices.

He is currently interested in political sociology, particularly the formation of the American political identity, drawing upon several different concepts including national identity, immigration, stratification, and political institutions and organizations. Furthermore, he is interested in studying contemporary social movements, especially the ways in which social movements interact with and foster national and political identity, as well as the cultural, social, and political processes involved in forming these social movements.  

Cohort Year: 

Zoltan Dujisin

Zoltan Dujisin

UNI: 
znd2102
znd2102@columbia.edu
Zoltan
Dujisin
Areas of Interest: 
Political Sociology, Sociology of Elites, Sociology of Knowledge, Politics of Memory, Nationalism, Post-Communism, Eastern Europe
Biographical Note: 

Zoltán Dujisin is a PhD candidate and a Paul F. Lazarsfeld Fellow. He has a degree in Political Science from the Technical University of Lisbon (2005), having then obtained an MA in Nationalism Studies from Central European University (2006) in Budapest.

In 2004 he started working as a foreign correspondent for the Portuguese weekly Expresso and the global news agency Inter Press Service (IPS), having been based in the Czech Republic, Hungary and Ukraine.

In 2009 he began a PhD in Political Science at the Doctoral School of Public Policy at Central European University. In 2013 he obtained an MPhil in Political Science and transferred to Columbia Sociology, where he was granted advanced standing.

His dissertation attempts to identify the actors, institutions and structural processes that are crystallizing a relatively homogenous, yet pan-European discourse on the memory of communism. He seeks to assess the consequences of this process for both the European Union's prevailing memory regime and for domestic political competition in post-communist countries.

Cohort Year: 

Bailey Brown

Bailey Brown

UNI: 
bab2194
bab2194@columbia.edu
Bailey
Brown
Areas of Interest: 
Education, Race, Social Networks, Sociology of the Family
Education: 

MPhil Columbia University

M.A. Columbia University

B.A. University of Pennsylvania

Biographical Note: 

Bailey Brown is a Ph.D. student in Sociology and a Paul F. Lazarsfeld Fellow and Ford Foundation Predoctoral Fellow at Columbia University. Her research interests include race, education, social networks and stratification/inequality.

Bailey’s most recent research has explored issues of race and educational inequality in urban neighborhoods. Bailey's work focuses on how neighborhood contexts shape family and youth outcomes. She has used GIS analysis to examine charter school development in the Greater Philadelphia area and conducted a qualitative study of West Philadelphia’s rental housing sector to provide a context for understanding how low-income parents seek affordable rental housing. As part of her dissertation work, Bailey researches the specific disadvantages low-income Black and Latino families face in the area of housing and school choice in New York City.  

Bailey’s senior thesis, which was awarded the E. Digby Baltzell Award, focused on the intersection of housing choices and schooling options available to families in West Philadelphia. She conducted interviews with parents to explore how they navigated their decision-making process and to provide insight into the obstacles parents may face given limited access to neighborhood resources.


Bailey received her undergraduate degree in sociology from the University of Pennsylvania with minors in urban education and Africana studies. She participated in the Ronald E. McNair Scholars program at her home institution and the Leadership Alliance research program at the University of Chicago. During her undergraduate career, she worked as a mentor and tutor for students attending schools in West Philadelphia, which cultivated her interests in schooling experiences and neighborhoods.

Cohort Year: 
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