Graduate Students

Jonathan Lin

Jonathan Lin

UNI: 
jl4169
jl4169@columbia.edu
Jonathan
Lin
Biographical Note: 

Jonathan Lin received his Bachelor of Arts in Sociology from CUNY Brooklyn College with a minor in history. His undergraduate studies focused on Immigration, education, and labor, with an emphasis on East Asian communities in New York. His undergraduate thesis dealt with second generation values among the Chinese community in New York City, and how parental values and expectations influence second generation education and career choices.

He is currently interested in political sociology, particularly the formation of the American political identity, drawing upon several different concepts including national identity, immigration, stratification, and political institutions and organizations. Furthermore, he is interested in studying contemporary social movements, especially the ways in which social movements interact with and foster national and political identity, as well as the cultural, social, and political processes involved in forming these social movements.  

Cohort Year: 

Zoltan Dujisin

Zoltan Dujisin

UNI: 
znd2102
znd2102@columbia.edu
Zoltan
Dujisin
Areas of Interest: 
Political Sociology, Sociology of Elites, Sociology of Knowledge, Politics of Memory, Nationalism, Post-Communism, Eastern Europe
Biographical Note: 

Zoltán Dujisin is a PhD candidate and a Paul F. Lazarsfeld Fellow. He has a degree in Political Science from the Technical University of Lisbon (2005), having then obtained an MA in Nationalism Studies from Central European University (2006) in Budapest.

In 2004 he started working as a foreign correspondent for the Portuguese weekly Expresso and the global news agency Inter Press Service (IPS), having been based in the Czech Republic, Hungary and Ukraine.

In 2009 he began a PhD in Political Science at the Doctoral School of Public Policy at Central European University. In 2013 he obtained an MPhil in Political Science and transferred to Columbia Sociology, where he was granted advanced standing.

His dissertation attempts to identify the actors, institutions and structural processes that are crystallizing a relatively homogenous, yet pan-European discourse on the memory of communism. He seeks to assess the consequences of this process for both the European Union's prevailing memory regime and for domestic political competition in post-communist countries.

Cohort Year: 

Bailey Brown

Bailey Brown

UNI: 
bab2194
bab2194@columbia.edu
Bailey
Brown
Areas of Interest: 
Education, Race, Social Networks, Sociology of the Family
Education: 

MPhil Columbia University

M.A. Columbia University

B.A. University of Pennsylvania

Biographical Note: 

Bailey Brown is a Ph.D. student in Sociology and a Paul F. Lazarsfeld Fellow and Ford Foundation Predoctoral Fellow at Columbia University. Her research interests include race, education, social networks and stratification/inequality.

Bailey’s most recent research has explored issues of race and educational inequality in urban neighborhoods. Bailey's work focuses on how neighborhood contexts shape family and youth outcomes. She has used GIS analysis to examine charter school development in the Greater Philadelphia area and conducted a qualitative study of West Philadelphia’s rental housing sector to provide a context for understanding how low-income parents seek affordable rental housing. As part of her dissertation work, Bailey researches the specific disadvantages low-income Black and Latino families face in the area of housing and school choice in New York City.  

Bailey’s senior thesis, which was awarded the E. Digby Baltzell Award, focused on the intersection of housing choices and schooling options available to families in West Philadelphia. She conducted interviews with parents to explore how they navigated their decision-making process and to provide insight into the obstacles parents may face given limited access to neighborhood resources.


Bailey received her undergraduate degree in sociology from the University of Pennsylvania with minors in urban education and Africana studies. She participated in the Ronald E. McNair Scholars program at her home institution and the Leadership Alliance research program at the University of Chicago. During her undergraduate career, she worked as a mentor and tutor for students attending schools in West Philadelphia, which cultivated her interests in schooling experiences and neighborhoods.

Cohort Year: 

Emily Vasquez

Emily Vasquez

UNI: 
eev2105
eev2105@columbia.edu
Emily
Vasquez
Department: 
Sociomedical Sciences
Areas of Specialty: 
STS • Critical Global Health • Risk • Chronic Disease • Genetic & Genomic Technologies • Latin America • Race & Ethnicity • Latino Identity in the United States
Biographical Note: 

Emily Vasquez is studying the social dimensions of diabetes and diabetes risk in Mexico.  Broadly, she is interested in how biomedical science and its applications shape our social world, including notions of care, hope, responsibility, and identity and racial formation. She previously earned an MPH at Columbia University and is an Allan Rosenfield doctoral fellow in the department of Sociomedical Sciences and Sociology. She is also an affiliate of the Science & Technology Studies (S&TS) Laboratory in the Facultad de Ciencias of the National Autonomous University of Mexico (UNAM) in Mexico City.

Cohort Year: 2011

Brooke West

Brooke West

UNI: 
bsw2110
fa2224@columbia.edu
Brooke
West
Department: 
Sociomedical Sciences
Biographical Note: 

Brooke S. West is a doctoral candidate in the Department of Sociomedical Sciences, pursuing a joint degree in Sociology and Public Health.  At the broadest level, Brooke's research focuses on the social determinants of health, primarily in the context of HIV prevention and treatment.  Her dissertation, "The Real Risks of Fishing: Reconceptualizing HIV Risk among Drug Using Fishermen in Malaysia," is a mixed methods analysis of how risk perception and HIV risk decision-making are fundamentally social processes that are shaped by social networks and conceptualizations of masculinity.  She has also conducted research with women involved in sex work in India, migrant marketplace workers in Kazakhstan, and has looked at the intersection between gender, water/sanitation, and HIV health outcomes in sub-Saharan Africa.  While a doctoral student at Columbia, she has held an NIH-funded training fellowship in Gender, Sexuality, and Health and a NIDA-funded training fellowship in Drug Abuse Research.  She has also served as a Visiting Research Fellow in the Faculty of Medicine at the University of Malaya in Kuala Lumpur. Currently, she works as the Principal Research Associate on a NIDA-funded study assessing changes over time in the HIV epidemic among injection drug users in 96 of the largest cities in the United States. Her work has been published in AIDS and Behavior, AIDS, PLoS One, and is forthcoming in the International Journal of Drug Policy.

Devon Tyrone Wade

Devon Tyrone Wade

dtw2114@columbia.edu
Devon
Wade
Areas of Interest: 
Urban Sociology, Crime & Deviance, Social Mobility and Racial & Ethnic Inequality
Education: 

Columbia Univeristy, New York, New York

M.A., Sociology (2013)

Louisiana State University, Baton Rouge, Louisiana  

B.A., cum laude, Sociology and Criminology (2010)

B.A., cum laude, African & African American Studies (2010) 

Biographical Note: 

Devon Wade is a doctoral student and Paul F. Lazarsfeld Fellow in the department of sociology at Columbia University. Devon’s substantive research areas are urban sociology, crime & deviance, social mobility and racial & ethnic inequality. His current doctoral research focuses the understanding of inequality along racial and class lines as it pertains to criminality and urban areas. In particular, he is interested in the collateral consequences that incarceration has on the family - more specifically, the impact that stigma has on this group of children and how perception is influenced. Devon is a recipient of multiple prestigious awards including the Truman Scholarship, the Ford Foundation Pre-Doctoral Fellowship and the National Science Foundation Fellowship.


Devon balances his research agenda with community involvement and advocacy. His passion is youth advocacy and mentoring. He has traveled across the country speaking at prisons, providing motivational and keynote addresses, as well talking about the effects of parental incarceration at various conferences. He works with a non-profit organization in Houston, TX for children of incarcerated parents called No More Victims as well as organizations in New York City that aid children from low-income areas.

 

Cohort Year: 

Sarah Elizabeth Sachs

Sarah Elizabeth Sachs

UNI: 
ses2137
ses2137@columbia.edu
Sarah
Sachs
Graduate Student
Department: 
Sociology
Areas of Interest: 
sociology of big data, classification, science knowledge and technology studies, work and organizations, qualitative methods, ethnography
Cohort Year: 

Nicol Valdez

Nicol Valdez

UNI: 
nmv2116
Nicol
Valdez
Cohort Year: 

Anthony Urena

Anthony Urena

UNI: 
au2172
au2172@columbia.edu
Anthony
Urena
Areas of Interest: 
Medical Sociology, Health Inequality, Risk, Gender & Sexuality, Race & Ethnicity
Education: 

Columbia University, M.A, Sociology (2014); 

Brown University, B.A, honors, Sociology (2012); B.A, Human Biology - Health and Disease (2012)

Areas of Specialty: 
Biographical Note: 

Anthony is a PhD student in Sociology and a Paul F. Lazarsfeld Fellow at Columbia University. His research interests include Health Inequality, Risk, and Gender & Sexuality. His work focuses on the role of risk perceptions in the persistence of health disparities in marginalized communities.

Anthony holds a B.A. in both Sociology and Human Biology from Brown University. As a Mellon Mays Undergraduate Fellow, he produced an ethnography detailing the persistence of HIV/AIDS in Rio de Janeiro's metropolitan and slum neighborhoods. His honors thesis in Sociology drew from his experiences volunteering at several Brazilian AIDS NGOs in the evaluation of contemporary prevention and awareness strategies. 

At Columbia, Anthony continues to study the experience of health inequality. His dissertation research explores the formation of illness risk perceptions at the governmental, community, and individual level. Variance in risk perceptions within and across these groups can lead to different illness risk management behavior. An improper consideration of this variance, he argues, can lead incomplete interventions that may not be fully contextualized for the communities that need them most. His work examines the complexity of the HIV/AIDS experience among New York City's MSM of color population and how risk perceptions may vary by age.

Cohort Year: 

Erela Portugaly

Erela Portugaly

UNI: 
ep2661
ep2661@columbia.edu
Erela
Portugaly
Areas of Interest: 
Household expenditure, Mental health, Gender family and Academia
Cohort Year: 
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