Courses

The following is a summary of undergraduate courses offered by faculty of the Department of Sociology in the Fall of 2016 and the Spring of 2017. You may also want to look up the full Fall 2016 and Spring 2017 Directory of Classes. Contingent on approval from the Director of Undergraduate Studies and the instructor, advanced undergraduates who have the appropriate preparation may enroll in 4000- and some 6000-level courses. These levels are listed as graduate courses.

 

SOCI UN1000 The Social World. 3 points.

Identification of the distinctive elements of sociological perspectives on society. Readings confront classical and contemporary approaches with key social issues that include power and authority, culture and communication, poverty and discrimination, social change, and popular uses of sociological concepts.







Fall 2016: SOCI UN1000
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
SOCI 1000 001/61513 M W 10:10am - 11:25am
501 Schermerhorn Hall
Gil Eyal 3 127/150
Spring 2017: SOCI UN1000
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
SOCI 1000 001/71003 T Th 11:40am - 12:55pm
301 Pupin Laboratories
Teresa Sharpe 3 177/180

SOCI UN2240 Economy and Society. 3 points.

An introduction to economic sociology.  Economic sociology is built around the claim that something fundamental is lost when markets are analyzed separately from other social processes.  We will look especially at how an analysis of the interplay of economy and society can help us to understand questions of efficiency, questions of fairness, and questions of democracy.







Spring 2017: SOCI UN2240
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
SOCI 2240 001/26901 M W 1:10pm - 2:25pm
313 Fayerweather
Joshua Whitford 3 70/70

SOCI UN3000 Social Theory. 3 points.

BC: Fulfillment of General Education Requirement: Reason and Value (REA)., BC: Fulfillment of General Education Requirement: Social Analysis (SOC I)., BC: Fulfillment of General Education Requirement: Ethics and Values.

Prerequisites: Sophomore standing.

Required for all sociology majors.  Prerequisite: at least one sociology course of the instructor's permission.  Theoretical accounts of the rise and transformations of modern society in the19th and 20th centuries.  Theories studied include those of Adam Smith, Tocqueville, Marx, Durkheim, Max Weber, Roberto Michels.  Selected topics:  individual, society, and polity; economy, class, and status: organization and ideology; religion and society; moral and instrumental action.







Fall 2016: SOCI UN3000
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
SOCI 3000 001/05710 M W 11:40am - 12:55pm
504 Diana Center
Deborah Becher 3 64/70
Spring 2017: SOCI UN3000
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
SOCI 3000 001/19008 M W 10:10am - 11:25am
717 Hamilton Hall
Gil Eyal 3 60/60

SOCI UN3010 Methods for Social Research. 4 points.

BC: Fulfillment of General Education Requirement: Social Analysis (SOC I)., BC: Fulfillment of General Education Requirement: Quantitative and Deductive Reasoning (QUA).

Prerequisites: SOCI W1000 The Social World or Instructor Permission

Required for all Sociology majors.  Introductory course in social scientific research methods. Provides a general overview of the ways sociologists collect information about social phenomena, focusing on how to collect data that are reliable and applicable to our research questions.







Fall 2016: SOCI UN3010
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
SOCI 3010 001/06191 M W 1:10pm - 2:25pm
324 Milbank Hall
Christel Kesler 4 41
Spring 2017: SOCI UN3010
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
SOCI 3010 001/74470 T Th 1:10pm - 2:25pm
310 Fayerweather
Jacob Boersema 4 65/75

SOCI UN3020 Social Statistics. 3 points.

BC: Fulfillment of General Education Requirement: Quantitative and Deductive Reasoning (QUA).

This course introduces methods of empirical social research for describing and drawing inferences from quantitative data. Emphasis is on basic but very serviceable methods of statistical analysis for information drawn from surveys or archives. The course includes several exercises in analysis of sample survey data.

SOCI UN3490 Mistake, Misconduct, Disaster. 3 points.

How Organizations Fail - the fundamental principles of organizations, examining how and why organizations fail, producing harmful outcomes.  Studying failures opens up parts of organizations for public view that are seldom seen; studying the dark side is especially revealing. Students will examine cases to identify the causes of failures and think about what kind of strategies can be developed that prevent failure.







Spring 2017: SOCI UN3490
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
SOCI 3490 001/27776 M W 2:40pm - 3:55pm
Room TBA
Diane Vaughan 3 70/70

SOCI UN3915 Stigma and Discrimination. 4 points.

This course considers stigma and discrimination as general processes that apply to a broad range of phenomena, from mental illness to obesity to HIV/AIDS to racial groups. We will use a conceptual framework that considers power and social stratification to be central to stigma and discrimination. We will focus on both macro- and micro-level social processes and their interconnections, and we will draw on literature from both sociology and psychology.







Spring 2017: SOCI UN3915
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
SOCI 3915 001/10922 T 2:10pm - 4:00pm
C01 Knox Hall
Mark Hatzenbuehler 4 18/20

SOCI UN3929 Collaboration, Resistance, Retribution: Western and Eastern Europe Between Nazism and Comm. 3 points.

The Nazi occupation of Western and East-Central Europe during World War II elicited a variety of national and local responses ranging from accommodation to collaboration to outright resistance. How did variations in practices of political, social, and economic domination exercised by the Nazis shape patterns of collaboration and resistance? How did this vary between Western and Eastern Europe? What individual factors/aspects of personal biography shaped decisions about whether or not to collaborate? In the immediate postwar period, how did efforts to identify and punish collaborators reflect prerogatives of national regeneration and state-building? Forty-five years later, the collapse of the socialist dictatorships of East-Central Europe unleashed calls for retribution against “communist collaborators.” How did practices of collaboration and resistance with socialist regimes differ from earlier patterns of collaboration with the Nazis? Have efforts to punish communist collaborators been more successful in righting the wrongs of the past than previous efforts to punish Nazi collaborators? If so, what might account for this? Do „legacies” from earlier efforts to punish Nazi collaborators inform these more recent projects of justice-seeking? How do unresolved justice issues from the immediate postwar period continue to haunt both Western and East-Central Europe?







Spring 2017: SOCI UN3929
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
SOCI 3929 001/88246 T 10:10am - 12:00pm
Room TBA
Louisa McClintock 3 2/15

SOCI UN3960 Law, Science, and Society. 4 points.

This course addresses basic contemporary social issues from several angles of vision: from the perspective of scientists, social scientists, legal scholars, and judges. Through the use of case studies, students will examine the nature of theories, evidence, "facts," proof, and argument as found in the work of scientists and scholars who have engaged the substantive issues presented in the course.







Spring 2017: SOCI UN3960
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
SOCI 3960 001/27138 M 10:10am - 12:00pm
Room TBA
Jonathan Cole 4 21/22

SOCI UN3974 Sociology of Schools, Teaching and Learning. 4 points.

In this class we will examine the school as a central institution in modern society, and we will grapple with an important question in the sociology of education: what role to schools play in reinforcing or challenging broader patters of social inequality? We will pay special attention to the ways in which students' class, race/ethnicity and gender shape their educational experiences. We will also look at how schools are organized, how schools construct differences among students, and how schools sort kids into different (and unequal) groups. Finally we will explore the types of interventions - at both the individual and organizational levels - that can mitigate inequality in educational achievement and help low-income students to succeed.

One such intervention that has shown promise is tutoring in academic and social and behavioral skills, and interventions that strengthen self-affirmation. A major component of this class is your experience as a tutor. You will be trained as tutors to work with students from local high schools both through in-person tutoring and through tutoring using social networking technologies. Throughout the semester we will combine our academic learning with critical reflection on our experience sin the field. Because you will be working with NYC high school students, we will pay special attention to how NYC high schools are organized and how current issues in education play out in the context of NYC schools.







Fall 2016: SOCI UN3974
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
SOCI 3974 001/72946 W 2:10pm - 4:00pm
703 Hamilton Hall
Teresa Sharpe 4 36/40

SOCI UN3985 Queer Practice. 4 points.

Is there a particularly “queer” way to live? Does a queer perspective mitigate for certain forms of social, interpersonal or political action? Are there sets of vocations, engagements or relationship formations that are, in and of themselves, distinctly queer? Or is queerness something that can infuse or transform pre-existing modes of personal or relational action? How does any of this relate to the version of “queer” one learns in college? Is a university education necessary, or even useful, for living a queer life? Does academic queer theory have any relevance to “real-world” politics, affects or activisms? Do classroom projects within Gender & Sexuality Studies prepare us to engage in projects of social change, political efforts, or in any meaningful way, to work more closely with others on shared goals related to social justice? Does a liberal arts education prepare us to navigate ideological, intellectual and interpersonal differences? To move from a critical gaze at social institutions into institutional change? To become more robust citizens of a world that includes a multiplicity of viewpoints, perspectives and values? Finally, at its best, what should the university classroom do to prepare students to forge their own social and political perspectives, and to move from gaze and consideration into movement and action?







Spring 2017: SOCI UN3985
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
SOCI 3985 001/29566 T 2:10pm - 4:00pm
509 Knox Hall
Tey Meadow 4 15/15

SOCI UN3996 Senior Seminar. 4 points.

Students wishing to qualify for departmental honors must take W3996y. Students carry out individual research projects and write a senior thesis under the supervision of the instructor and with class discussion. Written and oral progress reports.







Spring 2017: SOCI UN3996
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
SOCI 3996 001/26502 M 12:10pm - 2:00pm
707 Knox Hall
Adam Reich 4 6/20

 

SOCI G4130 Sociology of Expertise. 3 points.

A new approach to the classical problems of the sociology of knowledge - the social determination of knowledge and the social roles of those who create, possess, and distribute knowledge. This new approach rejects the current boundaries of inquiry and reunifies them as a network of practices straddling the boundaries of science and the professions.

SOCI G4138 Ethno-Religious Identity and Politics in the Middle East and South Asia. 3 points.

This is a comparative course intended to bridge areas and disciplines in the social sciences. Both the Middle East and South Asia are areas of democratization and conflict around issues of ethnic, religious, and communal issues.  The pull and push of democratic politics and conflict along communal dimensions can be studied fron an historical as well as comparative perspective, by looking at India, Pakistan, Turkey, Egypt, (and Syria, and Iraq) to understand first the historical legacies of communalisms and then the impact of religious and ethnic politics as they developed in the post democratic era.

SOCI G4220 Comparative Capitalism. 3 points.

A graduate seminar on changes in the social organization of developed world capitalist economies. Readings are drawn from literatures in economic sociology and political economy concerned with the implications of globalization, the weakening of welfare states, and the passing of the "golden age" of Fordist production.

SOCI G4338 Welfare Regimes and Inequality in Europe. 3 points.

Prerequisites: a course in Introduction in Applied Social Statistics (or equivalent).

The comparative welfare regime dynamics is an important field of the contemporary applied sociology, particularly in Europe. The now classic book of Esping-Andersen (1990): "Three world of welfare capitalism" has been an important debated milestone of the comparative sociology, in public policy, inequality/stratification, work, social change. In connection with birth-cohort analysis (Age-Period-Cohort APC), this course covers an important field of macrosociological research and comparative microdata survey analysis.

SOCI G4412 Migration and Mobilities in Europe. 3 points.

Migration studies has become a huge academic industry of late, but it is still often deeply embedded in dominant theories of (im)migration, race/ethnicity and assimilation essentially based on the experience of the United States. Our course takes as its premise the idea of seeing how different these subjects may look when taking Europe rather than the US as the paradigm for (im)migration. The course covers issues such as historical migration patterns in Europe; post-war immigration; citizenship; integration; new migrations and super diversity; mobilities and free movement; and new East-West and South-North migrations. It puts an accent on grounded sociological, geographical and anthropological style work (rather than the politics or ethics of immigration), including ethnographic, qualitative and quantitative approaches. Previous study on immigration or race/ethnicity in the US or elsewhere will be an advantage, but no pre-requisites required.

SOCI G6091 Historical Method and Documentary Analysis. 3 points.

Principles and techniques for the qualitative analysis of documents and the application of historical method to sociological research. Major emphasis on classification of sources, process of inference, formulation of problems for investigation, and adequacy of research techniques for the problem being investigated. Analysis of several historical studies.

SOCI GU4028 GENDER AND INEQUALITY IN FAMI. 4 points.

In-depth, critical exploration of  changing expectations and patterns of socialization for women and men in contemporary U. S. families.  Draws from family studies, gender studies, and LGBT studies to understand how gendered forces work to structure relations between and among family members.  Readings highlight socioeconomic, racial and ethnic variations in patterns of behavior, at times critiquing assumptions and paradigms drawn from the experiences of traditional, middle-class nuclear families. Topics include division of household labor in same-sex and different-sex couples, adolescent experiences growing up disadvantaged, what happens to undocumented immigrant children when they reach adulthood, gender inequality in wealthy white families, and ethnic differences in men’s expected roles in families. 

Fall 2017: SOCI GU4028
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
SOCI 4028 001/03527 W 2:10pm - 4:00pm
118 Barnard Hall
Mignon Moore 4 13/30

SOCI GU4043 WORKSHOP ON WEALTH & INEQUALITY. 1 point.

This Workshop is linked to the Workshop on Wealth & Inequality Meetings. This is meant for graduate students, however, if you are an advanced undergraduate student you can email the professor for permission to enroll.

SOCI GU4052 Methods Workshop. 4 points.

Open to students in the Master Program in sociology only.

Introducing students to a series of methods, methodological discussions, and questions relevant to the focus of the Masters program: urban sociology and the public interest.  Three methodological perspectives will frame discussions:  analytical sociology, small-n methods, and actor-network theory.

SOCI GU4063 Proseminar II. 1 point.

Open to students in the Master Program in sociology only.

The Proseminar fulfills two separate goals within the Free-Standing Masters Program in Sociology. The first is to provide exposure, training, and support specific to the needs of Masters students preparing to move on to further graduate training or the job market. The second goal is to provide a forum for scholars and others working in qualitative reserach, public sociology, and the urban environment.

SOCI GU4065 Fieldwork II. 1 point.

Open to students in the Master Program in sociology only.

This two-semester sequence supports students through the process of finding a fieldwork site, beginning the field work required to plan for and develop a Masters thesis, and the completion of their Masters thesis.

SOCI GU4067 Thesis Seminar II. 3 points.

Open to students in the Master Program in sociology only.

This seminar gives you an opportunity to do original sociological research with the support of a faculty member, a teaching assistant, and your fellow classmates.

SOCI GU4121 Racial and Ethnic Inequality. 3 points.

This seminar critically examines how racial/ethnic inequality is generated and maintained in contemporary American society. We will explore the merits and limitations of various paradigms that aim to explain racial inequalities and the concomitant social policies that have been implemented and/or proposed. Major topics include: residential segregation, wealth inequality, educational achievement, employment outcomes, crime & punishment, and culture.

SOCI GU4123 IMMIG INEQUALTY WELFARE STATE. 4 points.

Welfare states play a pivotal role in processes of social stratification; they are shaped by but also shape social inequalities. Whereas the first part of the course focuses on how immigration affects various dimensions of welfare states, the second half will focus on the opposite: the role that welfare states play in the incorporation of immigrants. Existing welfare states scholarship has focused significant attention on inequalities by gender and especially social class, and we will read and discuss a few of the most influential works on these topics as a point of departure. We will then turn to the small but growing literature that addresses immigrants’ social rights within various welfare regimes and the implications of these rights for inequalities between immigrant/immigrant-descended populations;majority populations.

Our topic necessitates an interdisciplinary approach. We will read works by sociologists, political scientists, and economists, and as relevant, we will discuss disciplinary differences in substantive focus and method.

SOCI GU4130 Sociology of Expertise. 3 points.

A new approach to the classical problems of the sociology of knowledge - the social determination of knowledge and the social roles of those who create, possess, and distribute knowledge. This new approach rejects the current boundaries of inquiry and reunifies them as a network of practices straddling the boundaries of science and the professions.

SOCI GU4270 Social Demography. 3 points.

This course introduces the ideas, facts, and materials of demography.  It explores social and economic causes and effects of population growth, composition, and distribution while considering demographic phenomena in both developing and developed countries.  Topics include the history of population growth in the world as well as social science perspectives.  The course includes some discussion of basic concepts in demographic analysis, but does not focus on methods of analysis or research techniques.

Fall 2017: SOCI GU4270
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
SOCI 4270 001/17494 Th 10:10am - 12:00pm
707 Knox Hall
Yao Lu 3 6/15

SOCI GU4336 The Sociology of Punishment. 3 points.

This graduate seminar mixes sociological and historical accounts in order to explore the
social determinants and consequences of the U.S. criminal justice system. The class casts a
wide net – exploring classical texts as well as contemporary scholarship from a range of
sociological traditions.

We begin by discussing classical texts in order to understand the theoretical traditions that
underlie the most interesting contemporary work on the sociology of punishment. Building
on the work of Marxist criminologists like Rusche and Kirchheimer, we explore the
relationship between the U.S. criminal justice system and the market. To what extent can we
understand the penal field as autonomous from economic relationships? To what extent do
economic forces or logics determine criminological thinking and practice? Building on
Durkheim, we explore how punishment is both reflective of social values and constitutive of
social solidarity, and investigate the symbolic consequences (intended and unintended) of
contemporary punishment regimes. Building on readings from Foucault, we explore
punishment and its relationship to the emergence of new forms of bureaucratic and
disciplinary power. Finally, with Goffman, we explore the interactive context of the prison
as relatively autonomous from the external forces that bring it into being.
With the classical theorists behind us, we turn to a history of the present. What is the age at
which we are living today? What are the economic, political, and symbolic causes and
consequences of mass incarceration? To what extent can we understand mass incarceration,
and more recent reform efforts, as reflective or constitutive of new forms of power in
contemporary society?
Finally, we conclude by asking what the future might hold. After four decades of explosive
growth, the U.S. incarceration rate has been declining slowly for the last several years. Crime
rates have declined steadily for the last quarter century. At the same time, Black Lives
Matter has put renewed focus on the ways in which the state continues to exert violence in
poor communities of color. How should we understand the current period of reform?
What are its social and political possibilities and limitations? What would a just justice system
even entail?

Spring 2017: SOCI GU4336
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
SOCI 4336 001/86549 W 2:10pm - 4:00pm
404 International Affairs Bldg
Adam Reich 3 22/40

SOCI GU4370 Processes of Stratification and Inequality. 3 points.

The nature of opportunity in American society; the measurement of inequality; trends in income and wealth inequality; issues of poverty and poverty policy; international comparisons.

Fall 2017: SOCI GU4370
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
SOCI 4370 001/64422 Th 4:10pm - 6:00pm
509 Knox Hall
Seymour Spilerman 3 23/30

SOCI UN2240 Economy and Society. 3 points.

An introduction to economic sociology.  Economic sociology is built around the claim that something fundamental is lost when markets are analyzed separately from other social processes.  We will look especially at how an analysis of the interplay of economy and society can help us to understand questions of efficiency, questions of fairness, and questions of democracy.

Spring 2017: SOCI UN2240
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
SOCI 2240 001/26901 M W 1:10pm - 2:25pm
313 Fayerweather
Joshua Whitford 3 51/70

SOCI UN3009 Contemporary Social Theory. 3 points.

This is a survey class that will familiarize students with the most important theoretical developments in post-war sociology.

Fall 2017: SOCI UN3009
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
SOCI 3009 001/22003 M W 1:10pm - 2:25pm
717 Hamilton Hall
Andreas Wimmer 3 19/75

SOCI UN3010 Methods for Social Research. 4 points.

Prerequisites: SOCI UN1000 The Social World or Instructor Permission

Required for all Sociology majors.  Introductory course in social scientific research methods. Provides a general overview of the ways sociologists collect information about social phenomena, focusing on how to collect data that are reliable and applicable to our research questions.

Spring 2017: SOCI UN3010
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
SOCI 3010 001/74470 T Th 1:10pm - 2:25pm
310 Fayerweather
Jacob Boersema 4 62/75
Fall 2017: SOCI UN3010
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
SOCI 3010 001/12110 T Th 10:10am - 11:25am
5ab Kraft Center
Maria Abascal 4 54/70

SOCI UN3020 Social Statistics. 3 points.

This course introduces methods of empirical social research for describing and drawing inferences from quantitative data. Emphasis is on basic but very serviceable methods of statistical analysis for information drawn from surveys or archives. The course includes several exercises in analysis of sample survey data.

SOCI UN3212 Methods of Social Research. 3 points.

Introduction to elementary data analysis. Definition and measurement of variables; testing hypotheses; interpretation of findings. Students perform simple analyses of data sets.

Spring 2017: SOCI UN3212
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
SOCI 3212 001/66178 T Th 11:40am - 12:55pm
252 Engineering Terrace
Yao Lu 3 9/20

SOCI UN3213 Sociology of African American Life. 3 points.

The course emphasizes the foundations and development of black communities following the great migration North, post -1940, and the mechanisms in society that create and maintain racial inequality. It also explores notions of identity and culture through the lenses of gender, class and sexual orientation, and the ideologies that form the foundation for black politics. The format for the course will be primarily lecture with some discussion.   The course is divided into three parts. Part one, “The (Second) Great Migration and its Consequences for African Americans,” begins in the mid-1930s as black families moved from the Jim Crow south to pursue other areas of work and social life in urban areas, particularly northern cities.  Our look at black migration, settlement and community structure turns to survival strategies in these new environments, critically analyzing the experiences of gender, poverty and socioeconomic disadvantage as they relate to structural changes in jobs and opportunities for working-class blacks.  In part two, “Structural Inequality and Gendered Ideas about Race” we focus on the structural aspects of inequality, investigating social mobility, wealth and different forms of capital. We also look at the intersections of race, class and gender as they relate to the experiences of black girls/women and boys/men in the media and in general society.  The final part of the course, “Black Identity and Culture,” examines contemporary meanings of “blackness,” racial group membership and institutions that reinforce and/or reinvent the social meanings of black racial identity. It analyzes the relationships between black political thought and black identity and behavior, emphasizing black nationalism, black feminism, black conservatism and black liberalism. The course concludes with an investigation of the intersection of race and sexuality and ways these overlapping identities influence the social organization of black LGBT life.

SOCI UN3225 Sociology of Education. 3 points.

All of us have spent many years in school and understand that schools impact our lives in important ways. But how exactly does formal schooling shape young people? And how do students make sense of their lives in the context of schools and educational systems more broadly? In this class we will examine education as a central institution in modern society, and we will grapple with an important question: What role does education play in reinforcing or challenging broader patterns of social inequality and mobility?   Particular emphasis will be placed on higher education as a critical site in which these processes take shape.

Spring 2017: SOCI UN3225
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
SOCI 3225 001/07492 M W 4:10pm - 5:25pm
324 Milbank Hall
Eleni Natsiopoulou 3 46/66

SOCI UN3261 Sexuality and Society. 3 points.

The purpose of this course is to explore the relationship between sexuality and society. Our aim is to provide an enormously broad introduction to this topic area, covering historical and national variation, exploring biological, psychological, historical, and sociological texts, and thinking critically about issues such as reproduction, desire, and identity. These readings can, at times, be demanding. Some will cover genetics; others will contain relatively dense cultural theory.

SOCI UN3264 The Changing American Family. 3 points.

Worries and debates about the family are in the news daily. But how in fact is "the family" changing? And why? This course will study the family from a sociological perspective with primary emphasis on continuity and change and variation across different historical eras. We'll examine how the diversity of family life and constellations of intimacy and care are shaped by gender, race, ethnicity, socioeconomic status, and sexuality.   Discussion section (required) will engage with readings as well as events in the news/ social media of interest to students.  

SOCI UN3285 Israeli Society and the Israeli-Palestinian Conflict. 3 points.

The purpose of the course is to acquaint students with Israeli society through the lens of the Israeli- Palestinian conflict. The underlying assumption in this course is that much of the social, economic, political, and cultural processes in contemporary Israel have been shaped by the 100-year Israeli- Arab/Palestinian conflict.

Fall 2017: SOCI UN3285
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
SOCI 3285 001/66822 M W 2:40pm - 3:55pm
101 Knox Hall
Yinon Cohen 3 10/50

SOCI UN3324 Global Urbanism. 3 points.

CC/GS/SEAS: Partial Fulfillment of Global Core Requirement

  Using classical texts about cities (do they still work for us?) and on the diverse new literatures on cities and larger sujects with direct urban implications, we ill use a variety of data sets to get a detailed empirical information, and draw on two large ongoing research projects involving major and minor global cities around the world (a total of over 60 cities are covered in detail as of 2008).

Fall 2017: SOCI UN3324
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
SOCI 3324 001/61591 M W 6:10pm - 7:25pm
417 International Affairs Bldg
Saskia Sassen 3 336/399

SOCI UN3490 Mistake, Misconduct, Disaster. 3 points.

How Organizations Fail - the fundamental principles of organizations, examining how and why organizations fail, producing harmful outcomes.  Studying failures opens up parts of organizations for public view that are seldom seen; studying the dark side is especially revealing. Students will examine cases to identify the causes of failures and think about what kind of strategies can be developed that prevent failure.

Spring 2017: SOCI UN3490
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
SOCI 3490 001/27776 M W 2:40pm - 3:55pm
717 Hamilton Hall
Diane Vaughan 3 41/70

SOCI UN3902 Design and Analysis of Research on Learning. 1 point.

Prerequisites: Students must work with the Tutoring and Learning Center as research interns.
This course is designed for Columbia and Barnard students who work with the Columbia University Tutoring and Learning Center (TLC) as research interns. Research interns tutor high school students in TLC partner schools, but they also participate in the collection and analysis of data relating to the effectiveness of the tutoring program. Research interns receive the same training, support, and supervision as other tutors and, in addition, participate in this biweekly seminar for which they will receive one academic credit per semester. Seminar participants will read articles on the theory and practice of tutoring and the academic achievement gap. In addition, these meetings will provide a venue for critical discussion of our emerging hypotheses and data collection strategies

Spring 2017: SOCI UN3902
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
SOCI 3902 001/74703 W 4:10pm - 6:00pm
701a Knox Hall
Teresa Sharpe 1 2/25

SOCI UN3914 Seminar in Inequality, Poverty, and Mobility. 4 points.

This is an undergraduate senior seminar in social stratication. The course focuses on the current American experience with socioeconomic inequality and mobility. The goals of the course are to understand how inequality is conceptualized and measured in the social sciences, to understand the structure of inequality in the contemporary U.S., to learn the principal theories and evidence for long term trends in inequality, to understand the persistence of poverty and the impact of social policies on American rates of poverty, and to understand the forces that both produce and inhibit intergenerational social mobility in the U.S. Given the nature of the subject matter, a minority of the readings will sometimes involve quantitative social science material. The course does not presume that students have advanced training in statistics, and any readings sections that contain mathematical or statistical content will be explained in class in nontechnical terms as needed. In these instances, our focus will not be on the methods, but rather on the conclusions reached by the author concerning the research question that is addressed in the text.

Fall 2017: SOCI UN3914
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
SOCI 3914 003/24271 T 2:10pm - 4:00pm
509 Knox Hall
Thomas DiPrete 4 17/20

SOCI UN3915 Stigma and Discrimination. 4 points.

This course considers stigma and discrimination as general processes that apply to a broad range of phenomena, from mental illness to obesity to HIV/AIDS to racial groups. We will use a conceptual framework that considers power and social stratification to be central to stigma and discrimination. We will focus on both macro- and micro-level social processes and their interconnections, and we will draw on literature from both sociology and psychology.

Spring 2017: SOCI UN3915
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
SOCI 3915 001/10922 T 2:10pm - 4:00pm
C01 Knox Hall
Mark Hatzenbuehler 4 18/20

SOCI UN3929 Collaboration, Resistance, Retribution: Western and Eastern Europe Between Nazism and Comm. 3 points.

The Nazi occupation of Western and East-Central Europe during World War II elicited a variety of national and local responses ranging from accommodation to collaboration to outright resistance. How did variations in practices of political, social, and economic domination exercised by the Nazis shape patterns of collaboration and resistance? How did this vary between Western and Eastern Europe? What individual factors/aspects of personal biography shaped decisions about whether or not to collaborate? In the immediate postwar period, how did efforts to identify and punish collaborators reflect prerogatives of national regeneration and state-building? Forty-five years later, the collapse of the socialist dictatorships of East-Central Europe unleashed calls for retribution against “communist collaborators.” How did practices of collaboration and resistance with socialist regimes differ from earlier patterns of collaboration with the Nazis? Have efforts to punish communist collaborators been more successful in righting the wrongs of the past than previous efforts to punish Nazi collaborators? If so, what might account for this? Do „legacies” from earlier efforts to punish Nazi collaborators inform these more recent projects of justice-seeking? How do unresolved justice issues from the immediate postwar period continue to haunt both Western and East-Central Europe?

Spring 2017: SOCI UN3929
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
SOCI 3929 001/88246 T 10:10am - 12:00pm
1201 International Affairs Bldg
Louisa McClintock 3 13/15

SOCI UN3931 Sociology of the Body. 4 points.

At once material and symbolic, our bodies exist at the intersection of multiple competing discourses, including the juridical, the technological, and the biopolitical. In this discussion-based seminar, we will draw upon both sociological and interdisciplinary literatures to consider some of the ways in which the body is constituted by such discourses, and itself serves as the material substratum for social and cultural life. Among the key questions we will consider are the following: What is “natural” about the body? How are distinctions made between normal and pathological bodies, and between psychic and somatic experiences?  How do historical and political-economic forces shape the perception and meaning of bodily existence? And finally: how do bodies that are multiply constituted by competing logics of gender, race, and class offer up resistance to these and other categorizations?

SOCI UN3960 Law, Science, and Society. 4 points.

This course addresses basic contemporary social issues from several angles of vision: from the perspective of scientists, social scientists, legal scholars, and judges. Through the use of case studies, students will examine the nature of theories, evidence, "facts," proof, and argument as found in the work of scientists and scholars who have engaged the substantive issues presented in the course.

Spring 2017: SOCI UN3960
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
SOCI 3960 001/27138 M 10:10am - 12:00pm
646 Jerome L Greene Hall
Jonathan Cole 4 22/22

SOCI UN3974 Sociology of Schools, Teaching and Learning. 4 points.

In this class we will examine the school as a central institution in modern society, and we will grapple with an important question in the sociology of education: what role to schools play in reinforcing or challenging broader patters of social inequality? We will pay special attention to the ways in which students' class, race/ethnicity and gender shape their educational experiences. We will also look at how schools are organized, how schools construct differences among students, and how schools sort kids into different (and unequal) groups. Finally we will explore the types of interventions - at both the individual and organizational levels - that can mitigate inequality in educational achievement and help low-income students to succeed.


One such intervention that has shown promise is tutoring in academic and social and behavioral skills, and interventions that strengthen self-affirmation. A major component of this class is your experience as a tutor. You will be trained as tutors to work with students from local high schools both through in-person tutoring and through tutoring using social networking technologies. Throughout the semester we will combine our academic learning with critical reflection on our experience sin the field. Because you will be working with NYC high school students, we will pay special attention to how NYC high schools are organized and how current issues in education play out in the context of NYC schools.

Fall 2017: SOCI UN3974
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
SOCI 3974 001/20753 F 10:10am - 12:00pm
517 Hamilton Hall
Teresa Sharpe 4 40/45

SOCI UN3985 Queer Practice. 4 points.

Is there a particularly “queer” way to live? Does a queer perspective mitigate for certain forms of social, interpersonal or political action? Are there sets of vocations, engagements or relationship formations that are, in and of themselves, distinctly queer? Or is queerness something that can infuse or transform pre-existing modes of personal or relational action? How does any of this relate to the version of “queer” one learns in college? Is a university education necessary, or even useful, for living a queer life? Does academic queer theory have any relevance to “real-world” politics, affects or activisms? Do classroom projects within Gender & Sexuality Studies prepare us to engage in projects of social change, political efforts, or in any meaningful way, to work more closely with others on shared goals related to social justice? Does a liberal arts education prepare us to navigate ideological, intellectual and interpersonal differences? To move from a critical gaze at social institutions into institutional change? To become more robust citizens of a world that includes a multiplicity of viewpoints, perspectives and values? Finally, at its best, what should the university classroom do to prepare students to forge their own social and political perspectives, and to move from gaze and consideration into movement and action?

Spring 2017: SOCI UN3985
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
SOCI 3985 001/29566 T 2:10pm - 4:00pm
509 Knox Hall
Tey Meadow 4 15/15

SOCI UN3995 Senior Seminar. 4 points.

Prerequisites: required methods and theory courses for the major, and the instructor's permission.

Students wishing to qualify for departmental honors must take W3996y. Students carry out individual research projects and write a senior thesis under the supervision of the instructor and with class discussion. Written and oral progress reports.

Fall 2017: SOCI UN3995
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
SOCI 3995 001/20464  
Adam Reich 4 1/20
SOCI 3995 002/12858  
Courtney Bender 4 0/20
SOCI 3995 003/61862  
Todd Gitlin 4 0/20
SOCI 3995 004/21919  
Jennifer Lena 4 0/20
SOCI 3995 005/15845  
Aaron Pallas 4 0/20
SOCI 3995 007/74612  
Michael Schudson 4 1/20
SOCI 3995 008/66838  
Julien Teitler 4 0/20
SOCI 3995 009/12113  
Dan Wang 4 0/20
SOCI 3995 010/66273  
Amy Wells 4 0/20

SOCI UN3996 Senior Seminar. 4 points.

Prerequisites: required methods and theory courses for the major, and the instructor's permission.

Students wishing to qualify for departmental honors must take W3996y. Students carry out individual research projects and write a senior thesis under the supervision of the instructor and with class discussion. Written and oral progress reports.

Spring 2017: SOCI UN3996
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
SOCI 3996 001/26502 M 12:10pm - 2:00pm
707 Knox Hall
Adam Reich 4 8/20

SOCI UN3998 Individual Study I. 1-6 points.

Prerequisites: open only to qualified majors in the department; the director of undergraduate studies' permission is required.

An opportunity for research under the direction of an individual faculty member. Students intending to write a year-long senior thesis should plan to register for C3996 in the spring semester of their senior year and are strongly advised to consult the undergraduate studies as they plan their programs.

Fall 2017: SOCI UN3998
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
SOCI 3998 002/71178  
Peter Bearman 1-6 1
SOCI 3998 003/11611  
Yinon Cohen 1-6 0
SOCI 3998 004/10976  
Jonathan Cole 1-6 0
SOCI 3998 005/70967  
Thomas DiPrete 1-6 0
SOCI 3998 006/20940  
Gil Eyal 1-6 0
SOCI 3998 008/14449  
Shamus Khan 1-6 0
SOCI 3998 009/60049  
Bruce Kogut 1-6 0
SOCI 3998 010/60481  
Bruce Link 1-6 0
SOCI 3998 011/70888  
Yao Lu 1-6 0
SOCI 3998 012/18950  
Denise Milstein 1-6 0
SOCI 3998 013/25030  
Alondra Nelson 1-6 2
SOCI 3998 014/16745  
Jo Phelan 1-6 0
SOCI 3998 015/12354  
Adam Reich 1-6 0
SOCI 3998 016/75010  
Saskia Sassen 1-6 0
SOCI 3998 017/29428  
Teresa Sharpe 1-6 16
SOCI 3998 018/14374  
Carla Shedd 1-6 0
SOCI 3998 019/18231  
Seymour Spilerman 1-6 0
SOCI 3998 020/66646  
David Stark 1-6 0
SOCI 3998 021/24362  
Van Tran 1-6 0
SOCI 3998 022/24978  
Diane Vaughan 1-6 0
SOCI 3998 023/25842  
Sudhir Venkatesh 1-6 0
SOCI 3998 024/28533  
Joshua Whitford 1-6 1
SOCI 3998 025/08001  
Mignon Moore 1-6 0
SOCI 3998 026/69303  
Andreas Wimmer 1-6 0
SOCI 3998 027/02734  
Elizabeth Bernstein 1-6 0

SOCI UN3999 Individual Study II. 1-6 points.

Prerequisites: open only to qualified majors in the department; the director of undergraduate studies' permission is required.

An opportunity for research under the direction of an individual faculty member. Students intending to write a year-long senior thesis should plan to register for C3996 in the spring semester of their senior year and are strongly advised to consult the undergraduate studies as they plan their programs.

Spring 2017: SOCI UN3999
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
SOCI 3999 001/14856  
Peter Bearman 1-6 0
SOCI 3999 002/12904  
Courtney Bender 1-6 0
SOCI 3999 003/20397  
Yinon Cohen 1-6 0
SOCI 3999 004/64814  
Jonathan Cole 1-6 0
SOCI 3999 005/63193  
Thomas DiPrete 1-6 0
SOCI 3999 006/24619  
Gil Eyal 1-6 0
SOCI 3999 007/18741  
Todd Gitlin 1-6 0
SOCI 3999 008/17100  
Shamus Khan 1-6 0
SOCI 3999 009/13113  
Bruce Kogut 1-6 0
SOCI 3999 010/62634  
Jennifer Lena 1-6 0
SOCI 3999 011/68073  
Bruce Link 1-6 0
SOCI 3999 012/72616  
Yao Lu 1-6 0
SOCI 3999 013/26666  
Denise Milstein 1-6 0
SOCI 3999 014/65877  
Mignon Moore 1-6 0
SOCI 3999 015/24042  
Alondra Nelson 1-6 0
SOCI 3999 016/15588  
Aaron Pallas 1-6 0
SOCI 3999 017/25469  
Jo Phelan 1-6 0
SOCI 3999 018/66521  
Adam Reich 1-6 2
SOCI 3999 019/73930  
Saskia Sassen 1-6 0
SOCI 3999 020/24635  
Emmanuelle Saada 1-6 0
SOCI 3999 021/62706  
Michael Schudson 1-6 1
SOCI 3999 022/64093  
Teresa Sharpe 1-6 0
SOCI 3999 023/11336  
Carla Shedd 1-6 1
SOCI 3999 024/19010  
Seymour Spilerman 1-6 0
SOCI 3999 025/06560  
David Stark 1-6 0
SOCI 3999 026/07238  
Julien Teitler 1-6 0
SOCI 3999 027/03388  
Van Tran 1-6 0
SOCI 3999 028/70122  
Diane Vaughan 1-6 0
SOCI 3999 029/26180  
Dan Wang 1-6 0
SOCI 3999 030/22286  
Amy Wells 1-6 0
SOCI 3999 031/29410  
Joshua Whitford 1-6 2
SOCI 3999 032/27988  
Andreas Wimmer 1-6 0

SOCI W2420 Race and Place in Urban America. 3 points.

The course analyzes the relationship between race/ethnicity and spatial inequality, emphasizing the institutions, processes, and mechanisms that shape the lives of urban dwellers. It surveys major theoretical approaches and empirical investigations of racial and ethnic stratification in several urban cities, and their concomitant policy considerations.

SOCI W3020 Social Statistics. 3 points.

BC: Fulfillment of General Education Requirement: Quantitative and Deductive Reasoning (QUA).

This course introduces methods of empirical social research for describing and drawing inferences from quantitative data. Emphasis is on basic but very serviceable methods of statistical analysis for information drawn from surveys or archives. The course includes several exercises in analysis of sample survey data.

SOCI W3207 Music, Race, and Identity. 3 points.

Music, Race and Identity explores the complex relationships among race, art, organization, economics, social movements, and identity. The three sections of the course each examines a major stage in American race relations: slavery and segregation, the period leading up to and through the civil rights revolution, and the post-civil rights era. Emphasis is on the shifting conceptions of identity and the changing role of race and racism in the spirituals, gospel music, minstrelsy, rhythm and blues, rock ‘n’ roll, crossover soul, Hip Hop, and contemporary popular music. As we make our way toward the current moment, two related questions will loom large in the light of the historical terrain we have traversed:  to what extent do issues of economic and social inequality more than membership in racial communities increasingly determine identity and taste? And to what extent can we say that we are moving toward a “postethnic” sensibility in the musical realm, in which displays of ethnic identity coexist with  trading places, the severing of racial ownership from aesthetic genre, and the blurring of racial boundaries.  

SOCI W3213 Sociology of African American Life. 3 points.

The course emphasizes the foundations and development of black communities following the great migration North, post -1940, and the mechanisms in society that create and maintain racial inequality. It also explores notions of identity and culture through the lenses of gender, class and sexual orientation, and the ideologies that form the foundation for black politics. The format for the course will be primarily lecture with some discussion.   The course is divided into three parts. Part one, “The (Second) Great Migration and its Consequences for African Americans,” begins in the mid-1930s as black families moved from the Jim Crow south to pursue other areas of work and social life in urban areas, particularly northern cities.  Our look at black migration, settlement and community structure turns to survival strategies in these new environments, critically analyzing the experiences of gender, poverty and socioeconomic disadvantage as they relate to structural changes in jobs and opportunities for working-class blacks.  In part two, “Structural Inequality and Gendered Ideas about Race” we focus on the structural aspects of inequality, investigating social mobility, wealth and different forms of capital. We also look at the intersections of race, class and gender as they relate to the experiences of black girls/women and boys/men in the media and in general society.  The final part of the course, “Black Identity and Culture,” examines contemporary meanings of “blackness,” racial group membership and institutions that reinforce and/or reinvent the social meanings of black racial identity. It analyzes the relationships between black political thought and black identity and behavior, emphasizing black nationalism, black feminism, black conservatism and black liberalism. The course concludes with an investigation of the intersection of race and sexuality and ways these overlapping identities influence the social organization of black LGBT life.

SOCI W3214 Immigration and the Transformation of American Society. 4 points.

In 2010, one in eight residents of the United States was born outside the country. This course will consider why people move and the policies that let some people in while keeping others out, assimilation and incorporation, the experiences of the immigrants and their U.S.-born children, and how sociologists theorize, measure, and evaluate immigrant incorporation. We will also look at the challenges immigrants bring to American society: post-9/11 concerns about security, questions about democracy, participation and language use, and debates about tolerance and multiculturalism. The course focuses on receiving countries and the lives of immigrants, not the impact of migration on those left behind.

SOCI W3261 Sexuality and Society. 3 points.

Every single person must make choices about their sexual identity and behavior. These choices involve the kind of intimate and sexual relationships they form and the consequences of these behaviors for their health and identity. Our course examines how sexuality and sexual identities are constructed, performed, questioned, and enforced in different contexts. The class will focus on specific contexts, including New York nightlife, postmodern film, and social media.  

SOCI W3265 Sociology of Work and Gender. 3 points.

This course examines gender as a flexible but persistent boundary that continues to organize our work lives and our home lives, as well as the relationship between the two spheres. We will explore the ways in which gender affects how work is structured; the relationship between work and home; the household as a place of paid (and unpaid) labor; and how changes in the global economy affect gender and work identities.

SOCI W3643 Stratification and Inequality. 3 points.

In this course we will examine the structure of inequality in American society and focus on related public policies such as approaches to taxation, social welfare programs, and strategies for alleviating poverty.

SOCI W3671 Media, Culture, & Society in the Age of the Internet. 3 points.

This course examines writings on "new media" and "social media." The focus will be on the ways that information technology has changed our social relations and experiences. We will examine different kinds of social collectivities, including "virtual communities," "crowd sourced" collaboratives and other kinds of social networks. Particular attention will be paid to the production and consumption of information and image, especially the making of cultural objects.

SOCI W3909 Deviance and Social Control. 4 points.

In this seminar. we will trace the historic shifts in causal theories of deviance and their significance for the societal response. The readings are classics of social research that have been of great historical impact. They range from the early focus on individual pathologies to sociological explanations, the most recent being attempts to understand deviance as a product of organization factors that result in harmful outcomes. Examples are Katrina, the 2008 financial crisis, and school shootings.

SOCI W3913 Race and Ethnicity in a Global World. 4 points.

This course covers five sections. First, students will explore sociological, historical, biological and anthropological approaches to the study of race and ethnicity. The historical roots of race theory and how race and ethnicity have changed over time in different places will be analyzed. Second, students will explore the role of race and ethnicity during colonialism. Students will read anti-colonial texts on race and racism such as Aime Cesaire, Frantz Fanon, and Steve Biko, but also Western sociologists such as Pierre Bourdieu and George Steinmetz to understand the racial and ethnic dynamic in the various European empires and their colonies. Third, students will explore the construction of self-styled white men's countries-from South Africa, to North America and Australia-in the 18th, 19th, and early 20th century to the final collapse of the last white supremacist regime in South Africa. Fourth, students will examine immigration and race; how the global flow of people impacts on racial hierarchies in countries and the process of racial integration. In particular, the case of Latinos in the United States and beyond will be studied. Finally, the fifth section is about anti-racism. Students will analyze the global movements to end racism and how we can conceptualize and study this process and its progress.

SOCI W3920 Social Networks. 3 points.

This seminar is intended as a theoretical and methodological introduction to social network analysis. Though network analysis is an interdisciplinary endeavor, its roots can be found in classical anthropology and sociology. Network analysis focuses on patterns of relations between actors. Both relations and actors can be defined in many ways, depending on the substantive area of inquiry. 

SOCI W3923 Adolescent Society. 4 points.

This seminar will explore the social and cultural construction of adolescence in contemporary American society.  Adolescence is an important life-stage where experiences and decision-making have both individual and group consequences.  Major themes will include: cultural and legal socialization of youth, crime and deviance, health and sexuality, employment and educational outcomes, and political behavior/civic engagement.

SOCI W3942 Contemporary Theory and Methods in Historical Sociology. 3 points.

New methods from network analysis and natural language processing are opening up new and exciting opportunities in historical sociology. This course presents the current state of the field through an exploration of its central theoretical themes, its main methodological challenges, and its more representatives empirical work, in order to expose students to the way in which these new new approaches are providing new solutions to the old challenges of explanation in historical perspective.

SOCI W3962 State-Society Relations in Post-Socialist China: Through the Lens of Social Theory. 3 points.

The course aims to both examine the interplay And interface between state and society in contemporary China, and look at Mechanisms that communicate information across this (at times blurry) boundary.