Courses

Courses being offered in a given semester are catalogued in the University Registrar's Directory of Classes, which includes times and locations as well as prerequisites, required permissions, and the unique numbers needed for registration. Any permissions required for courses are to be obtained prior to registration.

Below is a list of graduate courses offered by faculty of the Department of Sociology. Graduate registration, however, should not be limited to these courses and the department encourages graduate students to check out classes taught at other Columbia departments or at partner universities.


SOCI G4050 Sociological Theory: the Origins. 3 points.

Discussion Section Required

Prerequisites: this course is intended for sociology Ph.D. and SMS students. No others without the instructor's written permission.

Foundational sources and issues in sociological theory: Adam Smith, Marx, Durkheim, Weber, Simmel, Mead, Mauss, others; division of labor, individualism, exchange, class and its vicissitudes, social control, ideas and interests, contending criteria of explanation and interpretation.

SOCI G4051 Sociological Theory. 4 points.

Open to students in the Master Program in sociology only.

This course emphasizes the perspectives of foundational thinkers on the evolution and dynamics of social life. Readings address key sociological questions; including the configuration of communities, social control, institutions, exchange, interaction, and culture.

SOCI G4052 Methods Workshop. 4 points.

Open to students in the Master Program in sociology only.

Introducing students to a series of methods, methodological discussions, and questions relevant to the focus of the Masters program: urban sociology and the public interest.  Three methodological perspectives will frame discussions:  analytical sociology, small-n methods, and actor-network theory.

SOCI G4060 Sociological Methods. 3 points.

Open to students in the Master Program in sociology only.

The course is taught in three modules, each lasting four weeks and taught by a different faculty member.  This course offers an introduction to delve into three methods used in sociological inquiry: ethnography, social network analysis, and historical and comparative research.  Students will read pieces that discuss the priciples of each methodology as well as examples of each method put to work in a research project.

SOCI G4061 Contemporary Theory. 3 points.

Open to students in the Master Program in sociology only.

Introduction to perspectives in contemporary sociological theory.  The goal is to expose students to a diversity of theroetical writings while maintaining a thematic focus for each module of the course.  The course is taught by a team of three faculty members working in 4-week modules.

SOCI G4062 Proseminar. 1 point.

Open to students in the Master Program in sociology only.

The Proseminar fulfills two separate goals within the Free-Standing Masters Program in Sociology. The first is to provide exposure, training, and support specific to the needs of Masters students preparing to move on to further graduate training or the job market. The second goal is to provide a forum for scholars and others working in qualitative reserach, public sociology, and the urban environment.

SOCI G4063 Proseminar II. 1 point.

Open to students in the Master Program in sociology only.

The Proseminar fulfills two separate goals within the Free-Standing Masters Program in Sociology. The first is to provide exposure, training, and support specific to the needs of Masters students preparing to move on to further graduate training or the job market. The second goal is to provide a forum for scholars and others working in qualitative reserach, public sociology, and the urban environment.

SOCI G4064 Field Work. 1 point.

Open to students in the Master Program in sociology only.

This two-semester sequence supports students through the process of finding a fieldwork site, beginning the field work required to plan for and develop a Masters thesis, and the completion of their Masters thesis.

SOCI G4065 Fieldwork II. 1 point.

Open to students in the Master Program in sociology only.

This two-semester sequence supports students through the process of finding a fieldwork site, beginning the field work required to plan for and develop a Masters thesis, and the completion of their Masters thesis.

SOCI G4066 Thesis Seminar. 3 points.

Open to students in the Master Program in sociology only.

This seminar gives you an opportunity to do original sociological research with the support of a faculty member, a teaching assistant, and your fellow classmates.

SOCI G4067 Thesis Seminar II. 3 points.

Open to students in the Master Program in sociology only.

This seminar gives you an opportunity to do original sociological research with the support of a faculty member, a teaching assistant, and your fellow classmates.

SOCI G4068 The University in American Life. 3 points.

Open to 2nd year law students, juniors, and seniors only.

The 2015 seminar on The University in American Life will address the question: What ought a great university look like 25 years from now?  The United States has the greatest collection of research universities in the world.  We have few challengers for this preeminence.  Why should we look to change our universities?  This seminar will systematically examine the university from bottom to top and explore what changes inside the university and in the larger society are needed to optimize the potential as transmitter and producers of knowledge.   Issues about the structure of knowledge, about admissions, about the cost of higher learning, about the role of government in the university, about graduate schools, about the place of the humanities and social and behavioral science in the new university will be considered.  The seminar will also examine the way universities and the legal system interact – from regulations to policies that government workplace harassment, discrimination, and sexual assault. All aspects of the university will be open for examination – from its administrative to its academic structure; from its relationships among its own units to its relationships with other institutions.  We will consider whether the pipeline feeding these universities is broken and how one might begin to think about repairing it.  Many other topics will be taken up as well.   The requirements for the seminar are simple: full participation and presence at seminar meetings and submission of one 15 page paper on a topic related to those that we will discuss.  One oral presentation of your ideas will also be part of the seminar.

SOCI G4075 Introductory Social Data Analysis. 3 points.

Corequisites: SOCI G4076, SOCI G4077

SOCI G4097 Designs of Social Research. 4 points.

Open to sociology Ph.D. students only; all others must receive the instructor's permission. Enrollment limited to 20.

Required of all incoming sociology doctoral students. Prepares students who have already completed an undergraduate major or its equivalent in some social science to evaluate and undertake both systematic descriptions and sound explanations of social structures and processes.

SOCI G4099 Field Research Methods. 3 points.

Prerequisites: the instructor's permission.

Intensive supervised group and individual practice in doing sociological participant observation.

SOCI G4130 Sociology of Expertise. 3 points.

A new approach to the classical problems of the sociology of knowledge - the social determination of knowledge and the social roles of those who create, possess, and distribute knowledge. This new approach rejects the current boundaries of inquiry and reunifies them as a network of practices straddling the boundaries of science and the professions.

SOCI G4138 Ethno-Religious Identity and Politics in the Middle East and South Asia. 3 points.

This is a comparative course intended to bridge areas and disciplines in the social sciences. Both the Middle East and South Asia are areas of democratization and conflict around issues of ethnic, religious, and communal issues.  The pull and push of democratic politics and conflict along communal dimensions can be studied fron an historical as well as comparative perspective, by looking at India, Pakistan, Turkey, Egypt, (and Syria, and Iraq) to understand first the historical legacies of communalisms and then the impact of religious and ethnic politics as they developed in the post democratic era.

SOCI G4193 Social Action and Social Change. 3 points.

Many of us are drawn to sociology, because—at least at some level—we care about making the world more just.  The irony, however, is that sociology traditionally has had very little to say about the processes by which individuals and groups come together to address the kinds of inequalities that sociology is so good at identifying.  This class focuses on the theory and practice of organizing, defined most simply as the process by which individuals enable others to come together around shared values and common interests in such a way that enhances their power.

SOCI G4220 Comparative Capitalism. 3 points.

A graduate seminar on changes in the social organization of developed world capitalist economies. Readings are drawn from literatures in economic sociology and political economy concerned with the implications of globalization, the weakening of welfare states, and the passing of the "golden age" of Fordist production.

SOCI G4270 Social Demography. 3 points.

This course introduces the ideas, facts, and materials of demography.  It explores social and economic causes and effects of population growth, composition, and distribution while considering demographic phenomena in both developing and developed countries.  Topics include the history of population growth in the world as well as social science perspectives.  The course includes some discussion of basic concepts in demographic analysis, but does not focus on methods of analysis or research techniques.

Fall 2017: SOCI G4270
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
SOCI 4270 001/17494 Th 10:10am - 12:00pm
707 Knox Hall
Yao Lu 3 3/15

SOCI G4338 Welfare Regimes and Inequality in Europe. 3 points.

Prerequisites: a course in Introduction in Applied Social Statistics (or equivalent).

The comparative welfare regime dynamics is an important field of the contemporary applied sociology, particularly in Europe. The now classic book of Esping-Andersen (1990): "Three world of welfare capitalism" has been an important debated milestone of the comparative sociology, in public policy, inequality/stratification, work, social change. In connection with birth-cohort analysis (Age-Period-Cohort APC), this course covers an important field of macrosociological research and comparative microdata survey analysis.

SOCI G4412 Migration and Mobilities in Europe. 3 points.

Migration studies has become a huge academic industry of late, but it is still often deeply embedded in dominant theories of (im)migration, race/ethnicity and assimilation essentially based on the experience of the United States. Our course takes as its premise the idea of seeing how different these subjects may look when taking Europe rather than the US as the paradigm for (im)migration. The course covers issues such as historical migration patterns in Europe; post-war immigration; citizenship; integration; new migrations and super diversity; mobilities and free movement; and new East-West and South-North migrations. It puts an accent on grounded sociological, geographical and anthropological style work (rather than the politics or ethics of immigration), including ethnographic, qualitative and quantitative approaches. Previous study on immigration or race/ethnicity in the US or elsewhere will be an advantage, but no pre-requisites required.

SOCI G4550 Neighborhood Effect and Urban Poverty. 3 points.

In this seminar we will develop an understanding of major social trends affecting neighborhoods and communities, explore key concepts through which sociologists investigate cities and urban settings, become familiar with key theoretical debates on neighborhood effects and urban poverty, and apply concepts and methods from the course to the study of neighborhoods in New York City.

SOCI G5029 The Sociology of Sexualities. 3 points.

Despite the ubiquity of sexual imagery in contemporary Western popular culture, most people regard sexuality to be an intimate topic that concerns the drives, experiences and pleasures of individuals. In this course, we will examine the social and pluralistic character of sexual desires, meanings, practices and politics. We will begin with some of conceptual foundations that ground contemporary sociological studies of sexuality. We will think together about how knowledge about the social sources of sexuality is produced and some of the methodological, epistemological and ethical quandaries faced by researchers, including the ways our own sexualities, desires, inhibitions and identities frame our work. We will then examine some of the key fields in the sociology of sexualities, including work on sexual identities and social movements, the relationship between institutional contexts and sexual behavior, and intersections with the sociology of race, gender, risk, health and regulation. In each of these discussions, students will explore the varied methodological approaches to these topics within sociology, as well as some of the disciplinary and cultural challenges to making sexuality a central object of intellectual inquiry.

SOCI G5053 Contemporary Theory. 3 points.

Open to students in the Master Program in sociology only.

Introduction to perspectives in contemporary sociological theory.  The goal is to expose students to a diversity of theroetical writings while maintaining a thematic focus for each module of the course.  The course is taught by a team of three faculty members working in 4-week modules.

SOCI G6043 Political Sociology of Science and Medicine. 3 points.

This course explores twin phenomena: 1) the socio-cultural organization of the institutions of science and medicine and 2) the ways in which the biosciences and biomedicine have come to organize the social world. The understanding that science and its medical applications are central to contemporary societies-and indeed are transforming our social landscapes-will underlie our exploration. Themes discussed included medical inequality; biological citizenship; health social movements; race and health; scientific epistemology; genetics and genomics; and the "politics of life itself.

SOCI G6055 Sociology of Law. 3 points.

This course will introduce students to several lines of research in the sociology of law. Students will develop a familiarity with this research that allows them to identify the legal foundations of any aspect of social life. They will also learn to compare and contrast different perspectives on and theoretical approaches to understanding the social dimensions of law. By the end of the course, students should be able to identify areas of research in the sociology of law that are ripe for development.

SOCI G6091 Historical Method and Documentary Analysis. 3 points.

Principles and techniques for the qualitative analysis of documents and the application of historical method to sociological research. Major emphasis on classification of sources, process of inference, formulation of problems for investigation, and adequacy of research techniques for the problem being investigated. Analysis of several historical studies.

SOCI G6125 Analysis of Categorical Data. 3 points.

The analysis of categorical data has been an area of great interest to sociologists for over twenty years. Log-linear models have featured prominently in sociological applications. Topics covered will include modeling of categorical data (versus testing for association), logistic regression and multinomial logit models.

SOCI G6160 Special Topics - Israeli Society. 3 points.

This semester the seminar will focus on migration patterns to and from Israel. The seminar has two main parts. The first focuses on immigration patterns to Palestine/Israel from the late 19th century until the present. We will discuss Jewish immigration in the pre-state period, Arab forced migration in 1948, Jewish immigration to Israel until the 1967 war, and migration patterns from the late 1960s until the present. The second part of the course discusses emigration from Israel since 1948, which is viewed as a major social problem. The focus will be on the number of emigrants, their composition, the causes for emigration, return migration, and on the question of the brain drain from Israel.

SOCI G6320 Immigration, Cities, States: Deciphering the Global. 3 points.

Transnational processes such as economic globalization and cross-border migrations confront the social sciences with a series of theoretical and methodological challenges. This course examines these challenges through a focus oon both macro level cross-border flows and micro processes which might take place at a global or at a sub-national level. Particular attention will go to analyzing the challenges for theorization and empirical specification.

SOCI G6810 Organization Failure. 3 points.

Why and how do organizations fail? This seminar will teach the fundamental principles of organizations by examining how and why organizations fail, producing harmful outcomes. We will examine a range of these incidents as failures of organizational systems. The focus is on a variety of negative outcomes that are the unanticipated consequences of a system of action. Students will learn 1) how organizations work and the causes of organization failure, 2) how to do an organizational analysis, and 3) the connection between causes of failures and strategies for control.

SOCI G8201 New Directions in Economic Sociology. 3 points.

This is an advanced graduate seminar in Economic Sociology looking at new developments in this field. It addresses the disciplinary division of labor in which economists study value and sociologists study values; and it rejects the pact whereby economists study the economy and sociologists study social relations in which they are embedded.

SOCI G8280 Quantitative Strategies for Sociological Research. 3 points.

Working with selected readings of both theoretical and best practice empirical work and discussions of causal analysis with strategies for conducting quantitative social research. Much of the class time will involve presentation and discussion of quantitative strategies from the research projects of class participants.

SOCI G9081 Topics in Sociology of Expertise, Know.... 3 points.

The study of expertise, brings together the problems and concerns previously dealt with in different sub-disciplines and specializations such as the sociology of knowledge, the sociology of science and technology, the sociology of the professions, medical sociology, the sociology of bureaucratic and policy knowledge. The purpose of this course is to provide training and guidance for PhD students working in these fields, and to link their diverse investigations as dealing with the common problem of “expertise” and as sharing commonalities at the methodological and theoretical levels.  

SOCI G9120 Social Networks. 3 points.

Focus on theoretical and substantive themes within social network analysis, some of which are of general interest, some of which are of specific interest to the instructor. Also stressed are works in progress. Some technical solutions to substantive issues of interest - centrality, blocking, clusters, duality - are presented. Mathematical sophistication is unnecessary.

SOCI GR4064 Field Work. 1 point.

Open to students in the Master Program in sociology only.

This two-semester sequence supports students through the process of finding a fieldwork site, beginning the field work required to plan for and develop a Masters thesis, and the completion of their Masters thesis.

SOCI GR5001 Freedom: Personal, Political and Academic. 4 points.

Though this is a graduate seminar, undergraduate juniors and seniors are permitted to enroll. There are no pre-requisites for the course. The fourteen weeks of the course will consist of a combination of 1) lectures by the instructors followed by discussions, 2) discussions with guest visitors who are distinguished scholars in the field and whose work will be pre-circulated to the seminar, and 3) presentations by students on the readings on the syllabus.


Requirements: Strictly regular attendance, prior reading of weekly texts, and a term paper at the end of term of roughly 20-25 pages.


General Description:


The concept of freedom is analytically complex and has a long and varied intellectual history.   This course will focus on the concept as it emerged in the modern period (roughly since the seventeenth century in Europe) and focus in particular on three aspects of freedom.  Though the primary interest of the seminar will be on political and academic freedom, it will be useful to begin with a very brief discussion of the most abstract dimension of freedom by asking what notion of freedom might individual human subjects be said to possess given the determinism that seems to be everywhere indicated by the comprehensive explanatory power of modern science.  

SOCI GR5051 Sociological Theory. 4 points.

Open to students in the Master Program in sociology only.

This course emphasizes the perspectives of foundational thinkers on the evolution and dynamics of social life. Readings address key sociological questions; including the configuration of communities, social control, institutions, exchange, interaction, and culture.

SOCI GR5060 Sociological Methods. 3 points.

Open to students in the Master Program in sociology only.

The course is taught in three modules, each lasting four weeks and taught by a different faculty member.  This course offers an introduction to delve into three methods used in sociological inquiry: ethnography, social network analysis, and historical and comparative research.  Students will read pieces that discuss the principles of each methodology as well as examples of each method put to work in a research project.

SOCI GR5062 Proseminar. 1 point.

Open to students in the Master Program in sociology only.

The Proseminar fulfills two separate goals within the Free-Standing Masters Program in Sociology. The first is to provide exposure, training, and support specific to the needs of Masters students preparing to move on to further graduate training or the job market. The second goal is to provide a forum for scholars and others working in qualitative reserach, public sociology, and the urban environment.

SOCI GR5066 Thesis Seminar. 3 points.

Open to students in the Master Program in sociology only.

This seminar gives you an opportunity to do original sociological research with the support of a faculty member, a teaching assistant, and your fellow classmates.

SOCI GR6007 Race, Ethnicity, and Nation. 3 points.

TBD

SOCI GR6010 ISRAELI SOCIETY: SPEC. 3 points.

Fall 2017: SOCI GR6010
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
SOCI 6010 001/19166 W 4:10pm - 6:00pm
509 Knox Hall
Yinon Cohen 3 0/15

SOCI GR6051 Sociological Theory: the Origins. 3 points.

Prerequisites: this course is intended for sociology Ph.D. and SMS students. No others without the instructor's written permission.

Foundational sources and issues in sociological theory: Adam Smith, Marx, Durkheim, Weber, Simmel, Mead, Mauss, others; division of labor, individualism, exchange, class and its vicissitudes, social control, ideas and interests, contending criteria of explanation and interpretation.

SOCI GR6070 Social Stratification. 3 points.

The course focuses on relatively recent research, and is intended to introduce you to many of the major themes and ndings in this area. As many of the central questions in strati cation research are now active research sites for researchers in other social sciences as well as in sociology, the literature on this reading list is interdisciplinary whenever appropriate.

Spring 2017: SOCI GR6070
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
SOCI 6070 001/71379 T 2:10pm - 4:00pm
509 Knox Hall
Thomas DiPrete 3 12/15

SOCI GR6090 QUALITATIVE SOCIAL ANALYS. 4 points.

This course is strictly limited to doctoral students, primarily in Sociology. It is designed to provide students with an understanding of the methodological approaches we commonly think of as qualitative, with special emphases on case studies, mixed method research, interview-based research, ethnography, and comparative research. No auditors will be allowed.

This course is organized with the following four objectives in mind: (1) To give you basic training in qualitative research. This requires exposing you to issues of conceptualization, theory, research design, and strategies for framing questions. (2) To consider the various domains or topical areas in sociology where qualitative work has made major contributions. This includes reflecting on the usage of qualitative method in interpretive, descriptive, and explanatory research. (3) To examine the ethical responsibilities of qualitative researchers, who have closer contact with “subjects” and “informants” than other researchers typically do. (4) To think collectively and critically about the forms of writing (articles, dissertations, books, etc.) and professional presentations that sociologists must master to present qualitative work to their peers and the public.

Fall 2017: SOCI GR6090
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
SOCI 6090 001/26280 W 10:10am - 12:00pm
707 Knox Hall
Van Tran 4 8/20

SOCI GR6098 Quantitative Strategies for Causal Analysis. 4 points.

Prerequisites: Students should have an understanding of quantitative methodologies at the level of G4074 and G4075.

Quantitative strategies for sociological research will be investigated through selected readings of both theoretical and “best practice” empirical work. Discussions of causal analysis will be drawn from a number of texts and articles including the list in section 3. Class time will consist of three types of activities. Some time will be devoted to lecture by me about causal inference, the challenges to obtaining valid inference and strategies for overcoming these challenges. Other time will be devoted to a discussion of examples of various techniques using a variety of datasets. A third activity will be the discussion of substantive papers that nicely illustrate the problems and strategies for obtaining plausibly valid causal estimates. This third activity can also include the discussion of student research projects if they relate well to the material of the course.

SOCI GR6100 Empirical Research Seminar. 4 points.

Prerequisites: Completion of year 1 of the graduate program in Sociology. Sociology PhD students from year 2 onward only.

Writing research articles for journals is a lot of intellectual fun … but it’s also a rather demanding craft. This seminar prepares you for the challenge. It will help you to find an interesting question, a way to answer it, and a mode of communicating this to fellow sociologists in a way that they might find worth paying attention to. (Even) more pragmatically, the goal of this year-long seminar is to help you writing a quantitative research paper that will ultimately be suitable for presentation at a conference and submission to a journal, building valuable research and professional skills and, in many cases, providing you with a jump-start for your dissertation research.


As crucial milestones in the process, you will:


• Develop a theoretical argument that motivates hypotheses


• Identify a data set that can be used to test those hypotheses


• Format and analyze the data to draw conclusions about your hypotheses


• Interpret your results


• Present your argument and findings in a precise and compelling narrative form


In short, the course is partly about theory, and how it can be used to specify hypotheses and measures; partly about methods, and how data can be analyzed appropriately to test hypotheses; and partly about the craft of sociological writing, and how good writing can be used to make a clear and compelling case for your research.


Students entering their second year of graduate school are expected to be familiar with the main theoretical traditions in Sociology, have developed areas of substantive interest, be acquainted with the basic methodology of the social sciences, have an applied knowledge of statistical techniques, and be familiar with datasets they could possibly work with. The “Empirical seminar” is not intended to offer training in any of these areas—and this particular instructor’s capacity to provide advise on statistical techniques is rather limited indeed. Please consult with other faculty for more technical advice necessary to bring your research to fruition or make use of the statistical consulting service offered elsewhere at Columbia.

Fall 2017: SOCI GR6100
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
SOCI 6100 001/60821 M 4:10pm - 6:00pm
Room TBA
Andreas Wimmer 4 6/10

SOCI GR6101 Empirical Research Seminar. 4 points.

This second semester follows up closely on the first one. We will complete writing a quantitative, data-based empirical research paper that could be submitted to a sociology journal. In the first semester, we have worked on identifying a puzzle, situated the topic and question in the literature, developed major hypotheses, outlined the main analytical strategy and identified possible problems of causal inference, got the data ready to work with.


This semester we’ll actually do the analysis and write up the paper so that it is finalized by the due date. We’ll dedicate more class time to the discussion of your papers / problems than we did for proposals last semester. Along the way, this semester will review major issues of the interpretation and presentation of statistical results, of how to craft the narrative of a journal article, of how to present results graphically, in which journal to publish, and last but certainly not least: how to navigate a review process.

SOCI GR6995 Graduate Research Practicum. 3 points.

Course purpose is to serve as an omnibus opportunity for student professional development. Serves as a workshop as students narrow down a paper topic, develop a proposal, and carry out the research. Discussion includes how one selects a topic, how to find appropriate theory and data, and rhetorical strategies for making a paper "publishable," among other issues. Culminates in the completion of the M.Phil. paper.

Spring 2017: SOCI GR6995
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
SOCI 6995 001/77350 T 10:10am - 12:00pm
707 Knox Hall
Debra Minkoff 3 4/15

SOCI GR9041 Individual Study In Sociology II. 3 points.

May be taken for a letter grade more than once, provided different faculty members supervise the writing of papers.

Prerequisites: the director of graduate studies' permission if taking more than 3 points of study with any one faculty member.

Individual writing on a topic agreed upon by the supervising faculty member.

Spring 2017: SOCI GR9041
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
SOCI 9041 001/16198  
Peter Bearman 3 2
SOCI 9041 002/64405  
Courtney Bender 3 0
SOCI 9041 003/28830  
Yinon Cohen 3 0
SOCI 9041 004/63260  
Jonathan Cole 3 0
SOCI 9041 005/74568  
Thomas DiPrete 3 2
SOCI 9041 006/25763  
Gil Eyal 3 2
SOCI 9041 007/20230  
Todd Gitlin 3 0
SOCI 9041 008/73173  
Shamus Khan 3 2
SOCI 9041 009/26786  
Bruce Kogut 3 0
SOCI 9041 010/12615  
Jennifer Lena 3 0
SOCI 9041 011/76942  
Bruce Link 3 0
SOCI 9041 012/63570  
Yao Lu 3 0
SOCI 9041 013/16602  
Denise Milstein 3 1
SOCI 9041 014/21028  
Mignon Moore 3 0
SOCI 9041 015/77647  
Alondra Nelson 3 0
SOCI 9041 016/15029  
Aaron Pallas 3 0
SOCI 9041 017/74392  
Jo Phelan 3 0
SOCI 9041 018/28251  
Adam Reich 3 0
SOCI 9041 019/75492  
Saskia Sassen 3 0
SOCI 9041 020/20973  
Emmanuelle Saada 3 0
SOCI 9041 021/10809  
Michael Schudson 3 0
SOCI 9041 022/10585  
Teresa Sharpe 3 1
SOCI 9041 023/70835  
Carla Shedd 3 1
SOCI 9041 024/73705  
Seymour Spilerman 3 0
SOCI 9041 025/19834  
David Stark 3 0
SOCI 9041 026/15820  
Julien Teitler 3 0
SOCI 9041 027/62151  
Van Tran 3 1
SOCI 9041 028/68024  
Diane Vaughan 3 0
SOCI 9041 029/63259  
Dan Wang 3 0
SOCI 9041 030/27974  
Amy Wells 3 0
SOCI 9041 031/24333  
Joshua Whitford 3 0
SOCI 9041 032/11993  
Andreas Wimmer 3 0
SOCI 9041 033/72213  
Elizabeth Bernstein 3 1

SOCI GR9043 Individual Study In Sociology IV. 3 points.

May be taken for E credit more than once, provided different faculty members supervise the writing of papers.

Prerequisites: the director of graduate studies' permission if taking more than 3 points of study with any one faculty member.

Individual writing on a topic agreed upon by the supervising faculty member.

Spring 2017: SOCI GR9043
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
SOCI 9043 001/66470  
Peter Bearman 3 0
SOCI 9043 002/77080  
Courtney Bender 3 0
SOCI 9043 003/69877  
Yinon Cohen 3 0
SOCI 9043 004/77414  
Jonathan Cole 3 0
SOCI 9043 005/61378  
Thomas DiPrete 3 0
SOCI 9043 006/74617  
Gil Eyal 3 1
SOCI 9043 007/65736  
Todd Gitlin 3 0
SOCI 9043 008/19691  
Shamus Khan 3 0
SOCI 9043 009/20245  
Bruce Kogut 3 0
SOCI 9043 010/16096  
Jennifer Lena 3 0
SOCI 9043 011/76292  
Bruce Link 3 0
SOCI 9043 012/66198  
Yao Lu 3 0
SOCI 9043 013/21086  
Denise Milstein 3 0
SOCI 9043 014/66004  
Mignon Moore 3 0
SOCI 9043 015/19005  
Alondra Nelson 3 0
SOCI 9043 016/67529  
Aaron Pallas 3 0
SOCI 9043 017/20753  
Jo Phelan 3 0
SOCI 9043 018/22282  
Adam Reich 3 1
SOCI 9043 019/12717  
Saskia Sassen 3 0
SOCI 9043 020/13731  
Emmanuelle Saada 3 0
SOCI 9043 021/76336  
Michael Schudson 3 0
SOCI 9043 022/19374  
Teresa Sharpe 3 0
SOCI 9043 023/65178  
Carla Shedd 3 0
SOCI 9043 024/18737  
Seymour Spilerman 3 0
SOCI 9043 025/61667  
David Stark 3 0
SOCI 9043 026/26797  
Julien Teitler 3 0
SOCI 9043 027/27023  
Van Tran 3 0
SOCI 9043 028/25355  
Diane Vaughan 3 0
SOCI 9043 029/18445  
Dan Wang 3 0
SOCI 9043 030/23233  
Amy Wells 3 0
SOCI 9043 031/12064  
Joshua Whitford 3 0
SOCI 9043 032/73444  
Andreas Wimmer 3 0

SOCI GU4028 GENDER AND INEQUALITY IN FAMI. 4 points.

In-depth, critical exploration of  changing expectations and patterns of socialization for women and men in contemporary U. S. families.  Draws from family studies, gender studies, and LGBT studies to understand how gendered forces work to structure relations between and among family members.  Readings highlight socioeconomic, racial and ethnic variations in patterns of behavior, at times critiquing assumptions and paradigms drawn from the experiences of traditional, middle-class nuclear families. Topics include division of household labor in same-sex and different-sex couples, adolescent experiences growing up disadvantaged, what happens to undocumented immigrant children when they reach adulthood, gender inequality in wealthy white families, and ethnic differences in men’s expected roles in families. 

Fall 2017: SOCI GU4028
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
SOCI 4028 001/03527 W 2:10pm - 4:00pm
Room TBA
Mignon Moore 4 13/30

SOCI GU4043 WORKSHOP ON WEALTH & INEQUALITY. 1 point.

This Workshop is linked to the Workshop on Wealth & Inequality Meetings.

SOCI GU4052 Methods Workshop. 4 points.

Open to students in the Master Program in sociology only.

Introducing students to a series of methods, methodological discussions, and questions relevant to the focus of the Masters program: urban sociology and the public interest.  Three methodological perspectives will frame discussions:  analytical sociology, small-n methods, and actor-network theory.

SOCI GU4063 Proseminar II. 1 point.

Open to students in the Master Program in sociology only.

The Proseminar fulfills two separate goals within the Free-Standing Masters Program in Sociology. The first is to provide exposure, training, and support specific to the needs of Masters students preparing to move on to further graduate training or the job market. The second goal is to provide a forum for scholars and others working in qualitative reserach, public sociology, and the urban environment.

SOCI GU4065 Fieldwork II. 1 point.

Open to students in the Master Program in sociology only.

This two-semester sequence supports students through the process of finding a fieldwork site, beginning the field work required to plan for and develop a Masters thesis, and the completion of their Masters thesis.

SOCI GU4067 Thesis Seminar II. 3 points.

Open to students in the Master Program in sociology only.

This seminar gives you an opportunity to do original sociological research with the support of a faculty member, a teaching assistant, and your fellow classmates.

SOCI GU4121 Racial and Ethnic Inequality. 3 points.

This seminar critically examines how racial/ethnic inequality is generated and maintained in contemporary American society. We will explore the merits and limitations of various paradigms that aim to explain racial inequalities and the concomitant social policies that have been implemented and/or proposed. Major topics include: residential segregation, wealth inequality, educational achievement, employment outcomes, crime & punishment, and culture.

SOCI GU4123 IMMIG INEQUALTY WELFARE STATE. 4 points.

Welfare states play a pivotal role in processes of social stratification; they are shaped by but also shape social inequalities. Whereas the first part of the course focuses on how immigration affects various dimensions of welfare states, the second half will focus on the opposite: the role that welfare states play in the incorporation of immigrants. Existing welfare states scholarship has focused significant attention on inequalities by gender and especially social class, and we will read and discuss a few of the most influential works on these topics as a point of departure. We will then turn to the small but growing literature that addresses immigrants’ social rights within various welfare regimes and the implications of these rights for inequalities between immigrant/immigrant-descended populations;majority populations.

Our topic necessitates an interdisciplinary approach. We will read works by sociologists, political scientists, and economists, and as relevant, we will discuss disciplinary differences in substantive focus and method.

SOCI GU4130 Sociology of Expertise. 3 points.

A new approach to the classical problems of the sociology of knowledge - the social determination of knowledge and the social roles of those who create, possess, and distribute knowledge. This new approach rejects the current boundaries of inquiry and reunifies them as a network of practices straddling the boundaries of science and the professions.

SOCI GU4270 Social Demography. 3 points.

This course introduces the ideas, facts, and materials of demography.  It explores social and economic causes and effects of population growth, composition, and distribution while considering demographic phenomena in both developing and developed countries.  Topics include the history of population growth in the world as well as social science perspectives.  The course includes some discussion of basic concepts in demographic analysis, but does not focus on methods of analysis or research techniques.

SOCI GU4336 The Sociology of Punishment. 3 points.

This graduate seminar mixes sociological and historical accounts in order to explore the
social determinants and consequences of the U.S. criminal justice system. The class casts a
wide net – exploring classical texts as well as contemporary scholarship from a range of
sociological traditions.

We begin by discussing classical texts in order to understand the theoretical traditions that
underlie the most interesting contemporary work on the sociology of punishment. Building
on the work of Marxist criminologists like Rusche and Kirchheimer, we explore the
relationship between the U.S. criminal justice system and the market. To what extent can we
understand the penal field as autonomous from economic relationships? To what extent do
economic forces or logics determine criminological thinking and practice? Building on
Durkheim, we explore how punishment is both reflective of social values and constitutive of
social solidarity, and investigate the symbolic consequences (intended and unintended) of
contemporary punishment regimes. Building on readings from Foucault, we explore
punishment and its relationship to the emergence of new forms of bureaucratic and
disciplinary power. Finally, with Goffman, we explore the interactive context of the prison
as relatively autonomous from the external forces that bring it into being.
With the classical theorists behind us, we turn to a history of the present. What is the age at
which we are living today? What are the economic, political, and symbolic causes and
consequences of mass incarceration? To what extent can we understand mass incarceration,
and more recent reform efforts, as reflective or constitutive of new forms of power in
contemporary society?
Finally, we conclude by asking what the future might hold. After four decades of explosive
growth, the U.S. incarceration rate has been declining slowly for the last several years. Crime
rates have declined steadily for the last quarter century. At the same time, Black Lives
Matter has put renewed focus on the ways in which the state continues to exert violence in
poor communities of color. How should we understand the current period of reform?
What are its social and political possibilities and limitations? What would a just justice system
even entail?

Spring 2017: SOCI GU4336
Course Number Section/Call Number Times/Location Instructor Points Enrollment
SOCI 4336 001/86549 W 2:10pm - 4:00pm
404 International Affairs Bldg
Adam Reich 3 22/40

SOCI Q6050 Sociological Theory: the Origins. 3 points.

Discussion Section Required

Prerequisites: this course is intended for sociology Ph.D. and SMS students. No others without the instructor's written permission.

Foundational sources and issues in sociological theory: Adam Smith, Marx, Durkheim, Weber, Simmel, Mead, Mauss, others; division of labor, individualism, exchange, class and its vicissitudes, social control, ideas and interests, contending criteria of explanation and interpretation.

SOCI Q6099 Field Research Methods. 3 points.

Prerequisites: the instructor's permission.

Intensive supervised group and individual practice in doing sociological participant observation.