Gil Eyal

Gil Eyal

ge2027@columbia.edu
Professor
Phone: 
+1 212 854 4272
Campus Phone: 
MS 4-4272
3180000
Room: 
714 Knox
Office Hours: 
By appointment
606 W 122nd Street, Mail Code: 9649, United States
Areas of Interest: 
sociology of expertise, intellectuals, knowledge and science; Comparative Historical Sociology; Social Theory
Education: 

Ph.D., UCLA, 1997

Biographical Note: 

Gil Eyal's work deals with sociology of expertise, intellectuals and knowledge, in particular as it relates to broader political processes and to the interstitial spaces between fields. In two early books he has dealt with the transition from socialism to capitalism in Eastern Europe, and the role played by intellectuals, technocrats and in particular economists in the process. (With Ivan Szelenyi and Eleanor Townsley) Making Capitalism without Capitalists. (London: Verso, 1998); The Origins of Post-Communist Elites: From the Prague Spring to the Breakup of Czechoslovakia. (Minneapolis: University of Minnesota Press, 2003). A later book dealt with expertise about Arab affairs and the role it plays in Israeli society, government and the military: The Disenchantment of the Orient. (Stanford: Stanford University Press, 2006). His latest book provides a sociological explanation for the current autism epidemic, and traces the blurring of boundaries between experts and laypeople that play a role in the dynamics leading to the epidemic. (With Brendan Hart, Emine Onculer, Neta Oren and Natasha Rossi) The Autism Matrix: The Social Origins of the Autism Epidemic. (Cambridge: Polity Press, 2010). The approach applied in this book is developed further in his recent article: "For a Sociology of Expertise: The Social Origins of the Autism Epidemic,” AJS Vol. 118, No. 4 (January 2013), pp. 863-907.

Publications: 

 Gil Eyal, “For a Sociology of Expertise: The Social Origins of the Autism Epidemic,” AJS Vol. 118, No. 4 (January 2013), pp. 863-907.

 Gil Eyal, “Plugging into the Body of the Leviathan: Proposal for a New Sociology of Public Interventions,” Middle East - Topics & Arguments, Vol.1 (2013).

Gil Eyal and Larissa Buchholz, “From the Sociology of Intellectuals to the Sociology of Interventions,” Annual Review of Sociology 36 (2010), 117-137.

 Gil Eyal, Brendan Hart, Emine Onculer, Neta Oren and Natahsa Rossi, The Autism Matrix: The Social Origins of the Autism Epidemic. (Polity Press, June 2010).

Winner: Merton Prize for Best book given by the Science, Knowledge and Technology section of the American Sociological Association, 2012. 

 

                                                                                                                  

Gil Eyal, “Identity and Trauma: Two Forms of the Will to Memory,” History and Memory, Vol.16, no.1 (spring/summer 2004), 5-36.

Gil Eyal, Ivan Szelenyi and Eleanor Townsley, “On Irony: An Invitation to Neo-Classical Sociology,” Thesis 11, n.73 (May 2003), 1-37.

Johanna Bockmann and Gil Eyal, “Eastern Europe as a Laboratory of Economic Knowledge: The Transnational Roots of Neo-liberalism,” AJS Vol.108, No.2 (September 2002), 310-352.

Gil Eyal, “Dangerous Liaisons: The Relations between Military Intelligence and Middle Eastern Studies in Israel,” Theory and Society, Vol.31, No.5 (October 2002), 653-693.