Affiliated Faculty

Dan J. Wang

Dan J. Wang

UNI: 
djw2104
Dan
Wang
Assistant Professor of Business
Phone: 
+1 212 854 3401
Campus Phone: 
MS 4-3401
Department: 
Business^Management
511040X
101 Uris, United States

Jennifer C. Lena

Jennifer C. Lena

UNI: 
jcl42
jcl42@columbia.edu
Jennifer
Lena
Associate Professor
Fax: 
212.678.4048
Campus Phone: 
212.678.3271
Room: 
413B Zankel Hall
Areas of Specialty: 
Culture, Organizations, Elites, Stratification
Biographical Note: 

Jennifer C. Lena is Associate Professor of Arts Administration at Teachers College, Columbia University and has a courtesy appointment in the Department of Sociology. She is co-editor (with Frederick Wherry and Greta Hsu) of a book series, Culture and Economic Life, published by Stanford University Press. She is also co-editor of the journal Poetics. Lena currently serves on the Editorial Boards of Contemporary Sociology and Sociology Compass. She is past Chair of the Sociology of Culture Section of the American Sociological Association.

Lena is a past fellow of the Center for Arts and Cultural Policy Studies at Princeton University, and the Curb Center for Arts, Enterprise, and Public Policy at Vanderbilt University, and held faculty positions at Vanderbilt University and Barnard College. Her research focuses on understanding processes of classification, particularly the organizational and institutional conditions for the creation, modification, or elimination of cultural categories like genres. Lena also examines non-profit executive transitions and organizational closure, particularly in the visual and performing arts, and service organizations. She is the author of Banding Together: How Communities Create Genres in Popular Music (Princeton University Press, 2012), which was named one of Choice Reviews Outstanding Academic Titles for 2012Her research has been published in the American Sociological Review, Social Forces, Poetics, and American Behavioral Scientist, among other peer-reviewed journals, and has been reprinted in texts dedicated to highlighting excellence in social science methods, hip-hop scholarship, and the sociology of culture. Lena is reputed to be the first sociologist to commission a Grammy-nominated album: Hilos (composer: Gabriela Frank; performed by ALIAS Chamber Ensemble; released in 2010 by Naxos Records). Her current projects include a study of the increasingly broad and diverse tastes of U.S. elites, provisionally titled, Entitled

Publications: 

Representative examples from each research stream in the past several years:

Lena, Jennifer C. 2012. Banding Together: How Communities Create Genres in Popular Music. Princeton University Press.

Lena, Jennifer C. and Erin Johnston. 2015. “U.S. Cultural Engagement with Global Muslim Communities: Contours and Connections in an Emerging Field.” Grantmakers in the Arts Reader. Vol. 26 (1): 9-13.

Lena, Jennifer C. 2015. “Culture, Production of: Prospects for the Twenty-First Century.” International Encyclopedia of the Social and Behavioral Sciences. 2nd Edition. Section Ed. Kees van Rees; Ed. in Chief, James Wright. Elsevier. Pp. 608-613.

Lena, Jennifer C. and Danielle Lindemann. 2014. “Who is an Artist? New Data for an Old Question.” Poetics. Special issue: Art at the Crossroads. Ed. Victoria Alexander and Anne Bower. Vol. 43: 70-85.

Lena, Jennifer C. 2014. “Making It Work: The Education and Employment of Recent Arts Graduates.” Annual Report on the 2013 Strategic National Arts Alumni Project (SNAAP). With Sally Gaskill, Rebecca F. Houghton, Amber Lambert, Angie Miller, and Steven J. Tepper. Pp. 1-30.

Lena, Jennifer C. January/February 2013. “A Visit From The Credibility Squad.” Pacific Standard. Pgs. 32-35.

Lena, Jennifer C. 2011. “Tradition and Transformation at the Fan Fair Festival.” Pp. 224-248 in Negotiating Values in the Creative Industries: Fairs, Festivals and Competitive Events, ed. Brian Moeran and Jesper Strandgaard Pedersen. Cambridge University Press.

Bruce G. Link

Bruce G. Link

UNI: 
bgl1
Bruce
Link
Phone: 
+1 212 305 4547
Department: 
Sociomedical Sciences, Mailman School of Public Health

Todd Gitlin

Todd Gitlin

UNI: 
tg2058
Todd
Gitlin
Professor
Phone: 
+1 212 854 8124
Campus Phone: 
MS 4-8124
Department: 
School Of Journalism
1800000
Room: 
201F Journalism
Office Hours: 
By appointment
201F Journalism, Mail Code: 3800, United States
Areas of Interest: 
Mass Communication/Public Opinion, Cultural Sociology, Theory
Education: 

Ph.D., California (Berkeley), 1977

Biographical Note: 

Todd Gitlin, an American writer, sociologist, communications scholar, novelist, poet, and not very private intellectual,  is the author of fourteen books, including, most recently (with Liel Leibovitz), The Chosen Peoples:  America, Israel, and the Ordeals of Divine Election. Other titles include The Bulldozer and the Big Tent: Blind Republicans, Lame Democrats, and the Recovery of American Ideals; The Intellectuals and the Flag; Letters to a Young Activist; Media Unlimited: How the Torrent of Images and Sounds Overwhelms Our Lives; The Twilight of Common Dreams: Why America Is Wracked by Culture Wars; The Sixties: Years of Hope, Days of Rage; Inside Prime Time; The Whole World Is Watching; Uptown: Poor Whites in Chicago (co-author); three novels, Undying, Sacrifice and The Murder of Albert Einstein; and a book of poetry, Busy Being Born. These books have been translated into Japanese, Korean, Chinese, German, Italian, Portuguese, and Spanish. He also edited Watching Television and Campfires of the Resistance.

Courtney Bender

Courtney Bender

UNI: 
cb337
cb337@columbia.edu
Courtney
Bender
Professor
Chair, Department of Religion
Phone: 
+1 212 851 4134
Campus Phone: 
MS 1-4134
Department: 
Religion
3540000
Room: 
103, 80 Claremont Avenue
Office Hours: 
By appointment
80 Claremont, Room 202, Mail Code: 9610,United States
Areas of Interest: 
Cultural Sociology, Religion, Theory
Education: 

Ph.D., Princeton, 1997

Biographical Note: 
Courtney Bender, Professor of Religion at Columbia University, is an ethnographer and qualitative sociologist. Bender's primary research fields are the sociology of religion and culture, social theory, and North American religious history. She received her B.A. at Swarthmore College and her Ph.D. in Sociology at Princeton University.  She is the author of Heaven's Kitchen: Living Religion at God's Love We Deliver (University of Chicago Press 2003), The New Metaphysicals: Spirituality and the American Religious Imagination (University of Chicago Press 2010) and the co-editor of volumes on religious pluralism, secularism, and the sociology of religion. She recently served as the chair of the Social Science Research Council's research program New Directions in the Study of Prayer (2011-15). Bender’s current research investigates on the contributions of early twentieth century modernist movements to American spiritual cultures. 

Jo C. Phelan

Jo C. Phelan

UNI: 
jcp13
admin
Jo
Phelan
Associate Professor
Phone: 
+1 212 305 0406
Department: 
Sociomedical Sciences, Mailman School of Public Health
Office Hours: 
By appointment
Areas of Interest: 
Social Stigma, Conceptions of Mental Illness, Social Inequalities in Health and Mortality
Education: 

Ph.D., SUNY (Stony Brook), 1991

Biographical Note: 

Professor Phelan has addressed inequalities in physical and mental health; particularly those based on socioeconomic status, gender, and stigmatized statuses such as homelessness and mental illness. Her work locates the creation and perpetuation of inequalities in the interplay between social structural, cultural and social psychological processes. Phelan's contributions include calling attention to the biases introduced by the 'point-prevalence' method of estimating the homeless population’s size and characteristics and, in an analysis published in the American Sociological Review, exploring the well established and longstanding association between level of formal education and political liberalism and tolerance. In that work, she provided empirical evidence to critique the dominant theory that education increases tolerance through a process of fundamental personality change, providing support for "socialization" theory-based explanations, in which educational institutions shape attitudes to conform to the prevailing "official" or "ideal" culture. Her work illuminates how education and, by extension, social environments in general, shape political attitudes—which is relevant not just to the issue of homelessness but more broadly to other social inequalities, including those based on socioeconomic status, race, ethnicity and gender.

Phelan's current work focuses on 1) stigma and mental illness, 2) social consequences of the genetics revolution, and (with Bruce Link) 3) socioeconomic status as a "fundamental cause" of inequalities in mortality. Phelan’s scholarship (with Link) on attitudes toward mental illness, published in the Annual Review of Sociology, analyzes stigma as a process encompassing prejudice and discrimination, and fundamentally based in socially-structured power hierarchies. Her use of advances in understanding stigma and mental illness to inform our understanding of the social psychological aspects of other socially significant inequalities, including those based on race, ethnicity, gender and sexual orientation, has made Phelan internationally recognized as one of the leading scholars in the area of mental-illness stigma. Phelan is also one of the few scholars to explore the sociological implications of the Human Genome Project. Her NIH-funded program of research exploring the impact of the genetics revolution on the stigma attached to serious mental illnesses has found that genetic attributions increased the perceived seriousness and persistence of mental illness as well as the belief a mentally-ill individual’s siblings and children are likely to develop the same problem, suggesting that the Human Genome Project does bear with it the possibility of spreading stigma to biological relatives of stigmatized individuals. Phelan’s new NIH-funded study explores the information and ideas that the media are disseminating to the public and analyzes public understanding and response to that information, expanding her work to other stigmatized statuses that are also very likely to be influenced by changing knowledge and beliefs about genetics, such as obesity, cancers and minority racial status. The third area of Phelan’s work, supported by a prestigious Investigator Award from the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation, is her widely cited collaborative research (with Link) on fundamental causes of mortality, which has both conceptualized the paths through which socioeconomic inequality creates mortality differentials and developed a body of supporting empirical work to substantiate their arguments.

Phelan's future work on the potential impact of the genetics revolution, social conditions as fundamental causes of inequalities in mortality, and stigma includes two specific projects already underway. With support from NIMH, her study on public understandings of 'genetic risk' combines qualitative and quantitative methods and a well-developed body of theory (expectation states theory) to explore in greater depth how people understand genetic risk and how accurate information about risk can best be communicated to people. Second, she and Link will continue their work on the mechanisms through which socioeconomic inequality creates mortality differentials, exploring the proposition that one key element of this relation is that advances in knowledge about the prevention and/or treatment of the disease create mortality advantage for high-SES individuals.

Amy Stuart Wells

Amy Stuart Wells

UNI: 
asw86
admin
Amy
Wells
Professor
Phone: 
+1 212 678 4042
Campus Phone: 
TC 4042
Department: 
Teachers College
Office Hours: 
By appointment
Areas of Interest: 
Educational Policy, Race and Education, Charter Schools, School Desegregation, School Choice Policy
Education: 

Ph.D., Columbia, 1991

Biographical Note: 

Amy Stuart Wells is a Professor of Sociology and Education, and the Coordinator of Policy Studies at Teachers College, Columbia University. Her research and writing has focused broadly on issues of race and education and more specifically on educational policies, such as school desegregation, school choice, charter schools, and tracking, and how they shape and constrain opportunities for students of color. She is the recipient of several honors and awards, including a 2001-02 Fellowship from the Carnegie Corporation's Scholars Program; the 2000 Julius & Rosa Sachs Lecturer, Teachers College-Columbia University; and the 2000 AERA Early Career Award for Programmatic Research.

Julien O Teitler

Julien O Teitler

UNI: 
jot8
admin
Julien
Teitler
Associate Professor
Phone: 
+1 212 851 2376
Campus Phone: 
MS 1-2376
Department: 
Sch Of Social Work
2400000
Room: 
712 School of Social Work
Office Hours: 
By appointment
1255 Amsterdam Ave, Room 712, Mail Code: 4600,United States
Areas of Interest: 
Adolescent Transitions, Social Inequality, Family Policy
Education: 

Ph.D., Pennsylvania, 1996

Biographical Note: 

Julien Teitler is Associate Professor of Social Work and Sociology and Director of the Columbia University Social Indicators Survey Center. Teitler’s research focuses on the effects of social environments and policies on families and children, on health disparities, and on research methodology. Teitler teaches classes in Human Behavior and the Social Environment and in Research Methodology.

Professor Teitler’s research focuses on the effects of social contexts on health and fertility, and on how social environments and policies affect families and children. Recent studies include cross-national comparisons of fertility trends and health disparities, how welfare participation and mental health affect marriage, and the effect of neighborhood racial composition on birth outcomes. His current projects focus on the measurement of social networks and neighborhoods, changes in immigrant health over time spent in the U.S., explaining trends in teen fertility, and the role of prenatal care on successive fertility.

Michael S Schudson

Michael S Schudson

UNI: 
ms3035
admin
Michael
Schudson
Professor
Phone: 
+1 212 854 8277
Campus Phone: 
MS 4-8277
Department: 
School Of Journalism
1800000
Room: 
201D Journalism
Office Hours: 
By appointment
201D Journalism, Mail Code: 3812, United States
Areas of Interest: 
History and Sociology of the American News Media, Advertising, Popular Culture, Watergate, and Cultural Memory
Education: 

Ph.D., Harvard, 1976

Biographical Note: 

Michael Schudson grew up in Milwaukee, Wisc. He received a B.A. from Swarthmore College and M.A. and Ph.D. in sociology from Harvard. He taught at the University of Chicago from 1976 to 1980 and at the University of California, San Diego from 1980 to 2009. From 2005 on, he split his teaching between UCSD and the Columbia University Graduate School of Journalism, becoming a full-time member of the Columbia faculty in 2009.

He is the author of six books and editor of two others concerning the history and sociology of the American news media, advertising, popular culture, Watergate and cultural memory. He is the recipient of a number of honors; he has been a Guggenheim fellow, a resident fellow at the Center for Advanced Study in the Behavioral Sciences, Palo Alto, and a MacArthur Foundation "genius" fellow. In 2004, he received the Murray Edelman distinguished career award from the political communication section of the American Political Science Association and the International Communication Association.

Schudson's articles have appeared in the Columbia Journalism Review, Wilson Quarterly, and The American Prospect, and he has published op-eds in The New York Times, The Washington Post, the Los Angeles Times, Newsday, the Financial Times, and The San Diego Union.

Emmanuelle M Saada

Emmanuelle M Saada

UNI: 
es2593
admin
Emmanuelle
Saada
Associate Professor
Phone: 
+1 212 854 3691
Department: 
French and Francophone Studies
Room: 
504 Philosophy Hall
Office Hours: 
By appointment
Education: 

Ph.D., Ecole des Hautes Etudes en Sciences Sociales (EHESS), 2001

Biographical Note: 

Emmanuelle Saada joined the Department of French and Romance Philology at Columbia University in 2006. She received her academic training in France, first at the École Normale Supérieure in sociology and history and later at the Ecole des Hautes Etudes en Sciences Sociales (EHESS), where she received her PhD in 2001. From 1997 to 2003, she worked at the Institute of French Studies at New York University, first as Assistant Director and later as a faculty fellow. In 2003, she joined the faculty of the EHESS. Her main field of research is the historical sociology of colonization, with a specific interest in law, citizenship and families. Her first book, Les enfants de la colonie: les métis de l'Empire français entre sujétion et citoyenneté, was published in 2007 by La Découverte. Les enfants examined the connection between race, filiation and citizenship in the French empire. It was awarded the Auguste Pavie prize and was a finalist for the Jean Zay prize. An English translation by Arthur Goldhammer is forthcoming from the University of Chicago Press. Emmanuelle Saada is currently working on a book on the historiography of European colonialisms. She has also published numerous articles on colonial law, culture and politics as well as epistemological reflections on the French social sciences. Her teaching focuses on the history and sociology of immigration and colonization.

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