Faculty

Denise Milstein

Denise Milstein

UNI: 
dm531
dm531@columbia.edu
Denise
Milstein
Lecturer in Discipline
MA Adviser
Phone: 
+1 212 854 2963
Department: 
Sociology
Room: 
706 Knox
Office Hours: 
By appointment
Areas of Interest: 
Culture, Social Movements, Environmental Sociology, Qualitative Methods, Network Analysis
Education: 

Ph.D., Columbia, 2007

Biographical Note: 
Denise Milstein received her B.A. in Political Science and Latin American Studies from Brown University, and her Ph.D. in Sociology from Columbia University. Her work develops a relational, historically grounded perspective at the intersection of art, politics and, increasingly, the environment. Based in her examination of popular music, she has written and published on the articulation of urban imaginaries through songs, the impact of repression on artistic careers, the connection and conflict between political engagement and counter-culture, and the emergence of innovation from artistic revivals. Concerns with environmental sustainability, collaboration across disciplines, and participatory action research have become central to her most recent work. Current projects examine the evolution of relationships and interactions between and among the changing environment, natural and human built, and local communities, artists, and scientists in New York City and in Tierra del Fuego. She is most interested in how this dynamic gives rise to cultural shifts, social change and artistic innovation.
 
She trains and guides students in qualitative methods and coordinates the free-standing MA program in Sociology.

Josh Whitford

Josh Whitford

UNI: 
jw2212
jw2212@columbia.edu
Josh
Whitford
Associate Professor
Director of Graduate Studies
Department: 
Sociology
Room: 
618 Knox
Office Hours: 
Tuesdays 10:30-12:30
Areas of Interest: 
Economic Sociology, Organizations, Theory, Political Economy, Comparative Capitalisms, Work and Occupations, Economic Geography, Local and Regional Economic Development
Education: 

Ph.D., Wisconsin, 2003

Biographical Note: 

Josh Whitford’s interests include economic and organizational sociology, comparative political economy, economic geography and pragmatist social theory. His research focuses on the social, political and institutional implications of productive decentralization (outsourcing) in manufacturing industries in both the United States and Europe. He is especially interested in the causes and consequences of, but also fixes for, a series of “network failures” that he has shown to be endemic to decentralized production regimes. Whitford joined the Columbia Sociology faculty in 2004. He is a faculty affiliate at the Center on Organizational Innovation, co-directs the ISERP center on Data, Ethics, and Decisionmaking, and serves at Columbia on the Executive Committee of the Graduate School of Arts and Sciences, the Academic Review Committee, and the Educational Policy and Planning Committee. In February 2007, he was named an Industry Studies Fellow by the Alfred P. Sloan Foundation, and has received funding from the National Science Foundation to study government responses to network failures. He is the author of The New Old Economy: Networks, Institutions and the Organizational Transformation of American Manufacturing (Oxford University Press 2005), has written numerous articles including most recently studies of the mitigation of network failures by the American Manufacturing Extension Partnership and of the role that organizational politics play in the evolution of network firms

Publications: 

Google Scholar Profile

Brandt, P. and Whitford, J., 2017. Fixing network failures? The contested case of the American Manufacturing Extension Partnership. Socio-Economic Review, 15(2), pp. 331-357.

Whitford, J. and Zirpoli, F., 2016. The network firm as a political coalition. Organization Studies, 37(9), pp.1227-1248.

Whitford, J. and Zirpoli, F., 2014. Pragmatism, practice, and the boundaries of organization. Organization Science, 25(6), pp.1823-1839.

Lin, L. and Whitford, J., 2013. Conflict and Collaboration in Business Organization: A Preliminary Study. pp. 191-222 in J. Braucher, J. Kidwell and W. Whitford (eds), Revisiting the Contracts Scholarship of Stewart Macaulay: On the Empirical and the Lyrical. Oxford: Bloomsbury Publishing).

Zirpoli, F., Errichiello, L. and Whitford, J., 2013. Behavioral Decision-Making and Network Dynamics: A Political Perspective. In Behavioral Issues in Operations Management (pp. 199-219). Springer London

Whitford, J., 2012. Waltzing, relational work, and the construction (or not) of collaboration in manufacturing industries. Politics & Society, 40(2), pp.249-272.

Schrank, A. Whitford, J., 2011. The anatomy of network failure. Sociological Theory 29 (3) pp. 151-177.

Whitford, J. and Schrank, A., 2011. The paradox of the weak state revisited: industrial policy, network governance, and political decentralization. in F. Block and M. Keller (ed), State of Innovation: The U.S. Government's Role in Technology Development, (New York: Paradigm Press).

Rossi, F., Russo, M., Sardo, S. and Whitford, J., 2010. Innovation, generative relationships and scaffolding structures: implications of a complexity perspective to innovation for public and private interventions. In: Ahrweiler, P. (ed.) Innovation in complex social systems. Routledge Studies in Global Competition. Abingdon, UK: Routledge.

Schrank, A. and Whitford, J., 2009. Industrial policy in the United States: A neo-Polanyian interpretation. Politics & Society, 37(4), pp.521-553.

Whitford, J., 2009. Lessons from industrial districts for historically Fordist Regions in Becattini, G., M. Bellandi and L. De Propris (eds), The Handbook of Industrial Districts (Edward Elgar).

Whitford, J. and Potter, C., 2007. Regional economies, open networks and the spatial fragmentation of production. Socio-Economic Review 5 (3), pp. 497-526.

Whitford, J., 2005. The new old economy: Networks, institutions, and the organizational transformation of American manufacturing. Oxford University Press

Whitford, J. and Enrietti, A., 2005. Surviving the fall of a king: The regional institutional implications of crisis at Fiat Auto. International Journal of Urban and Regional Research, 29(4), pp.771-795. [In Italiano, in Stato e Mercato, 2006: "Quale Governance dopo una Monarchia"]

Whitford, J. and Zeitlin, J., 2004. Governing decentralized production: institutions, public policy, and the prospects for inter-firm collaboration in US manufacturing. Industry and Innovation, 11(1-2), pp.11-44.

Whitford, J., 2002. Pragmatism and the untenable dualism of means and ends: Why rational choice theory does not deserve paradigmatic privilege. Theory and Society, 31(3), pp.325-363.

Whitford, J., 2001. The decline of a model? Challenge and response in the Italian industrial districts. Economy and society, 30(1), pp.38-65.

David Stark

David Stark

UNI: 
dcs36
dcs36@columbia.edu
David
Stark
Arthur Lehman Professor of Sociology
Phone: 
+1 212 854 3972
Room: 
701C Knox
Office Hours: 
on Sabbatical Leave 2017-18
Areas of Interest: 
Economic Sociology, Sociology of Innovation, Organizations, Valuation, Democratization,
Education: 

Ph.D., Harvard, 1982

Biographical Note: 

David Stark is Arthur Lehman Professor of Sociology at Columbia University where he directs the Center on Organizational Innovation. He is also Professor of Social Science at the University of Warwick. Stark uses a variety of methods to study problems of valuation, innovation, and observation.

In his recent book, The Sense of Dissonance: Accounts of Worth in Economic Life (Princeton University Press, 2009), Stark carried out ethnographic research in three distinct settings to study how organizations and their members search for what is valuable. Dissonance – disagreement about the principles of worth – can lead to discovery.

Stark is currently directing a major research project on Diversity and Performance: Networks of Cognition in Markets and Teams supported by a five-year Advanced Career Award from the European Research Council. The project studies the network properties of cognition as organizations face three challenges of detecting error, allocating attention, and organizing innovation. Stark also directs a series of international workshops on Performances of Value: Competition and Competitions Inside and Outside Markets supported by a grant from The Leverhulme Trust. 

With continuous support from the National Sciences Foundation since 2000, Stark and his collaborators are contributing to the field of economic sociology. Papers on historical network analysis with his former student Balazs Vedres include: “Structural Folds” (American Journal of Sociology, 2010); “Social Times of Network Spaces” (AJS, 2006); and “Political Holes in the Economy” (American Sociological Review, 2012). With Columbia PhD student Mathijs de Vaan they recently published "Game Changer: The Topology of Creativity" in the American Journal of Sociology (Nov. 2015).

With Sheen Levine, he used experimental methods for a study, “Ethnic Diversity Deflates Price Bubbles” (Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences) and “Diversity Makes you Brighter,” (an OpEd piece in the New York Times)

Supported by another major grant from NSF, with Co-PI Matteo Prato, Stark is also working at the intersection of observation theory and network analysis to study how valuation is shaped by networks of attention. A recent paper, “Observing Finance as a Network of Observations” appears in Sociologica (September 2013). With former student, Daniel Beunza, Stark has been working on the social studies of finance. Their recent papers include: “From Dissonance to Resonance: Cognitive Interdependence in Quantitative Finance” (Economy and Society, 2012); and “Tools of the Trade: The Socio-Technology of Arbitrage in a Wall Street Trading Room” (Industrial and Corporate Change 2004).

Stark collaborated with art photographer Nancy Warner to publish This Place, These People: Life and Shadow on the Great Plains (Columbia University Press, 2014). He recently co-edited Moments of Valuation: Exploring Sites of Dissonance (Oxford University Press, 2015).

Other research addresses innovations in the public sphere including, for example, “PowerPoint in Public: Digital Technologies and the New Morphology of Demonstration” (with Verena Paravel) Theory, Culture & Society 2008; “Sociotechnologies of Assembly” (with Monique Girard) in Governance and Information: The Rewiring of Governing and Deliberation in the 21st Century, 2007; and “Rooted Transnational Publics: Integrating Foreign Ties and Civic Activism” (with Balazs Vedres and Laszlo Bruszt) Theory and Society 2006.

Stark was named a Guggenheim Fellow in 2002 and was awarded an honorary doctorate from the École normale supérieure de Cachan in 2013. He has been a visiting fellow at the Institute for Advanced Study, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou China; Ecole des Hautes Etudes en Sciences Sociales in Paris; the Center for Advanced Study in the Behavioral Sciences in Palo Alto; the Max Planck Institute for the Study of Societies in Cologne; the Copenhagen Business School; the Netherlands Institute of Advanced Study; the Russell Sage Foundation in New York City; the Institute of Advanced Study in Durham, UK; the University of Canterbury in Christchurch, New Zealand; the European University Institute in Florence; the Institute for Advanced Study/Collegium Budapest; the Center for the Social Sciences in Berlin; and the Institute for Human Sciences in Vienna.    

Yao Lu

Yao Lu

UNI: 
yl2479
yl2479@columbia.edu
Yao
Lu
Associate Professor
Office Hours: 
By appointment
Areas of Interest: 
Social Stratification, Migration and Immigration, Labor Markets, Collective Action, Health, Family, Chinese Society
Biographical Note: 

I am Associate Professor of Sociology, and faculty affiliate of the Columbia Population Research Center (CPRC), Weatherhead East Asian Institute (WEAI), Institute for Social and Economic Research and Policy (ISERP), and Institute of Latin American Studies (ILAS) at Columbia University.

My research focuses on social stratification and inequality, with primary emphasis on (1) how migration intersects with sociopolitical processes to shape inequalities in receiving and origin societies, and (2) how social and demographic processes influence political development, especially in Chinese society. Within these general areas, I have engaged a range of research fields in labor markets, collective action, health, families and children, gender, and social capital. I have pursued this research agenda from a comparative perspective, using data from a wide range of settings and sometimes directly comparing different contexts. My work seeks to demonstrate how studies of migration and social phenomena in comparative context can inform and expand general theories that are largely drawn from experiences of dominant population groups and from Western societies.

My research has been funded by three grants from the National Science Foundation, two grants from the National Institutes of Health (including a K01 Career Development Award), and grants from the Russell Sage Foundation and Chiang Ching-kuo Foundation. I have also collaborated with a team of international scholars to develop and conduct a national survey on the effect of migration on children in China. 

Publications: 

Publications (peer-reviewed)

In press   Lu, Yao, and Ran Tao. “Organizational Structure and Collective Action: Lineage Networks, Semi-autonomous Civic Associations, and Collective Resistance in Rural China.” American Journal of Sociology.

In press   Lu, Yao, Julia Wang, and Wen-Jui Han. “Women’s Employment Trajectories in the First Year Following Birth: Patterns, Determinants, and Variations by Race/Ethnicity and Nativity.” Demography.

In press   Lu, Yao, Wenjuan Zheng, and Wei Wang. “Migration and Popular Resistance in Rural China: Wukan and Beyond.” The China Quarterly.

2016        Kaushal, Neeraj, Yao Lu, Nicole Denier, Julia Shu-Huah Wang, and Stephen Trejo. “Immigrant Employment and Earnings Growth in Canada and the U.S.: Evidence from Longitudinal Data.” Journal of Population Economics 29:1249-1277.

2015        Lu, Yao. “Internal Migration, International Migration, and Physical Growth of Left-Behind Children: A Study of Two Settings.” Health & Place 36:118-126.

2015        Lu, Yao, and Ran Tao. "Female Migration, Cultural Context, and Son Preference in Rural China." Population Research and Policy Review 34(5):665-686.

2015        Kaushal, Neeraj, and Yao Lu. “Recent Immigration to Canada and the United States: A Mixed Tale of Relative Selection.” International Migration Review 49(2):279-522. [Equal authorship]

2014        Lu, Yao. “Parental Migration and Education of Left-behind Children: A Comparison of Two Settings.” Journal of Marriage and Family 76:1082-1098.

2014        Lu, Yao, and Lijian Qin. “Healthy Migrant and Salmon Bias Hypotheses: A Study of Health and Internal Migration in China.” Social Science and Medicine 102:41-48.

2013        Lu, Yao, Zai Liang, and Miao Chunyu. “Emigration from China in Comparative Perspective.” Social Forces 92(2):631-658.

2013        Lu, Yao, Danching Ruan, and Gina Lai. “Social Capital and Economic Integration of Migrants in Urban China.” Social Networks 35(3):357-369.

2013        Lu, Yao, and Feng Wang. “From General Discrimination to Segmented Inequality: Migration and Inequality in Urban China.” Social Science Research 42(6):1443-1456.

2013        Lu, Yao, and Hao Zhou. “Academic and Psychological Well-being of Migrant Children in China: School Segregation and Segmented Assimilation.” Comparative Education Review 57(1):85-166.

2013        Lu, Yao. “Household Migration, Remittances, and Their Impact on Health in Indonesia.” International Migration 51: 202-215. 

2012        Treiman, Donald J., Yao Lu, and Yaqiang Qi. “New Approaches to Demographic Data Collection.”  Chinese Sociological Review 44(3):56-92.

2012        Lu, Yao. “Education of Children Left Behind in Rural China.” Journal of Marriage and Family 74(2):328-341.

2012        Lu, Yao, Peifeng Hu, and Donald J. Treiman. “Migration and Depressive Symptoms in Migrant-Sending Areas: Findings from The Survey of Internal Migration and Health in China.” International Journal of Public Health 57(4):691-698.

2012        Lu, Yao. “Household Migration, Social Support, and Psychosocial Health: The Perspective from Migrant-Sending Areas.” Social Science and Medicine 74:135-142.

2011        Lu, Yao and Donald J. Treiman. “Migration, Remittances, and Educational Stratification among Blacks in Apartheid and Post-Apartheid South Africa.” Social Forces 89(4):1119-1144.

2010        Lu, Yao. “Mental Health and Risk Behaviors of Rural-Urban Migrants: Longitudinal Evidence from Indonesia.” Population Studies 64(2):147-163.

2010        Lu, Yao. “Rural-urban Migration and Health: Evidence from Longitudinal Data in Indonesia.” Social Science and Medicine 70(3): 412-419.

2009        McCarthy, William, Ritesh Mistry, Yao Lu, Minal Patel, and Hong Zheng, and Barbara Dietsch. “Could Density of Geocoded Tobacco Retailers near Schools Influence Risk of Students Smoking?” American Journal of Public Health 99(11):2006-2013.

2009        Lu, Yao. “Sibship Size, Family Organization, and Education in South Africa: Black-White Variations.” Research in Social Stratification and Mobility 27(2):110-125.

2009        Mistry, Ritesh, William McCarthy, Antronette Yancey, Yao Lu, and Minal Patel. “Resilience and Patterns of Health Risk Behaviors in California Adolescents.” Preventive Medicine 48(3):291-297.

2008        Lu, Yao and Donald J. Treiman. “The Effect of Family Size on Educational Attainment in China: Period Variations.” American Sociological Review 73(5):813-834.

2008        Li, Li, Zunyou Wu, Sheng Wu, Manhong Jia, Eli Lieber, and Yao Lu. “Impacts of HIV/AIDS Stigma on Family Identity and Interactions in China.”  Families, Systems and Health 26(4):431-442.

2008        Lu, Yao. “Test of the ‘Healthy Migrant Hypothesis’: A Longitudinal Analysis of Health Selectivity of Internal Migration in Indonesia.” Social Science and Medicine 67(8):1331-1339.

2007        Lu, Yao. “Educational Status of Temporary Migrant Children in China: Determinants and Regional Variations.” Asian and Pacific Migration Journal 16(1):29-55.

2006        Grusky, Oscar, Hongjie Liu, Xiaojing Li, Aimee-Noelle Swanson, Naihua Duan, Yibin Zhu, Erjian Ma, and Yao Lu. “Is Voluntary Counseling and Testing of Drug Users in China Feasible?” International Journal of STD and AIDS 17(5):354-355.

2006        Treiman, Donald J., William M. Mason, Yao Lu, Yi Pan, Yaqiang Qi, and Shige Song. “Observations on the Design and Implementation of Sample Surveys in China.”  Social Transformations in Chinese Societies 1(1):81-101.

 

Teaching

V3212            Statistics for Social Research

V3243            China Today: Change, Inequalities, and Social Life

G4074            Introductory Social Data Analysis I

G4075            Introductory Social Data Analysis II

G4270            Seminar on Social Demography

G4271            Seminar on Contemporary Chinese Society

 

Yinon Cohen

Yinon Cohen

UNI: 
yc2444
yc2444@columbia.edu
Yinon
Cohen
Yerushalmi Professor of Israel and Jewish Studies
Phone: 
+1 212 854 5361
Department: 
Sociology
Room: 
615 Knox
Office Hours: 
By appointment
Areas of Interest: 
International Migration, Social Stratification, Labor Markets
Education: 

Ph.D., SUNY (Stony Brook), 1982

Biographical Note: 

Yinon Cohen's research focuses on international migration, social stratification and labor markets. His recent research has examined the causes for rising inquality in the US.  Cohen is also involved in research on Israeli society on issues of unionization, socioeconomic ethnic and gender gaps, rising inequality, changing immigration and emigration patterns, and the demography of Jewish settlements in the occupied West Bank.  

Publications: 

Availalble at www.yinoncohen.com

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