Faculty

Bruce Western

in

Bruce Western

UNI: 
bw2562
Bruce
Western

Jennifer Lee

Jennifer Lee

jl5084@columbia.edu
Jennifer
Lee
Professor
Department: 
Sociology
Room: 
605 Knox Hall
Office Hours: 
by appointment

Maria Abascal

Maria Abascal

UNI: 
mca2113
mca2113@columbia.edu
Assistant Professor

Gil Eyal

Gil Eyal

UNI: 
GE2027
kw2510@columbia.edu
Gil
Eyal
Professor of Sociology
Phone: 
212-854-4272
Department: 
Sociology
Office Hours: 
By appointment only.
606 West 122nd Street
Areas of Interest: 
Sociology of Expertise Intellectuals Sociology of Knowledge and Science Comparative Historical Sociology Social Theory
Education: 

Ph.D., UCLA, 1997

Biographical Note: 

Gil Eyal's work deals with sociology of expertise, intellectuals and knowledge, in particular as it relates to broader political processes and to the interstitial spaces between fields. In two early books he has dealt with the transition from socialism to capitalism in Eastern Europe, and the role played by intellectuals, technocrats and in particular economists in the process. (With Ivan Szelenyi and Eleanor Townsley) Making Capitalism without Capitalists. (London: Verso, 1998); The Origins of Post-Communist Elites: From the Prague Spring to the Breakup of Czechoslovakia. (Minneapolis: University of Minnesota Press, 2003). A later book dealt with expertise about Arab affairs and the role it plays in Israeli society, government and the military: The Disenchantment of the Orient. (Stanford: Stanford University Press, 2006). His latest book provides a sociological explanation for the current autism epidemic, and traces the blurring of boundaries between experts and laypeople that play a role in the dynamics leading to the epidemic. (With Brendan Hart, Emine Onculer, Neta Oren and Natasha Rossi) The Autism Matrix: The Social Origins of the Autism Epidemic. (Cambridge: Polity Press, 2010). The approach applied in this book is developed further in his recent article: "For a Sociology of Expertise: The Social Origins of the Autism Epidemic,” AJS Vol. 118, No. 4 (January 2013), pp. 863-907.

Mignon R. Moore

Mignon R. Moore

UNI: 
mm1664
mm1664@columbia.edu
Mignon
Moore
Associate Professor
Phone: 
212-854-5910
Department: 
Barnard Sociology
Room: 
Milbank 332B
Office Hours: 
Wednesdays 2-4pm
Areas of Interest: 
Family, race, sexuality, gender, qualitative methods, aging, adolescence
Education: 

Ph.D., University of Chicago, 1998

Biographical Note: 

Professor Moore has research and teaching interests in the sociology of family, race, gender, sexuality, qualitative methods, aging, and adolescence. Her first book, Invisible Families: Gay Identities, Relationships and Motherhood among Black Women (2011 California Press) examined the intersection of race with sexual orientation for family-building and lesbian identity among African-American women. Her current research includes a new book project on the social histories of LGBT seniors in New York and Los Angeles, the negotiation of religious and community life for lesbians and gay men of faith, and the promotion of healthy aging for racial and ethnic minority elders.

Publications: 

Books

Moore, Mignon R. 2011. Invisible Families: Gay Identities, Relationships and Motherhood among Black Women. University of California Press.

 

Selected Publications

Moore, Mignon R. 2017. "Women of Color in the Academy: Navigating Multiple Intersections and Multiple Hierarchies." Social Problems 61, 2: 200-205

Moore, Mignon R. 2017. "Challenges, Triumphs and Praxis: Collecting Qualitative Data on Less Visible and Marginalized Populations." Other, Please Specify: Queer Methods in Sociology. D. Compton, T. Meadow & K. Shilt, eds. University of California Press.

Moore, Mignon R. 2015. “LGBT Populations in Studies of Urban Neighborhoods: Making the Invisible Visible.” City & Community 14, 3: 245-248.

Moore, Mignon R. 2016. “Division of Labor and Money Management in LGBQ Stepfamilies” in Abbie Goldberg (ed.), The SAGE Encyclopedia of LGBTQ Studies. Thousand Oaks, CA: Sage.

Moore, Mignon R. and Michael Stambolis-Ruhstorfer. 2013. “LGBT Sexuality and Families at the Start of the 21st Century.” Annual Review of Sociology 39: 491-507.

Moore, Mignon R.  2012. “Intersectionality and the Study of Black, Sexual Minority Women.” Gender & Society 26, 1: 33-39.

Moore, Mignon R. 2010. “Articulating a Politics of (Multiple) Identities: Sexuality and Inclusion in Black Community Life.” DuBois Review: Social Science Research on Race7, 2: 1-20.

Moore, Mignon R. 2008. “Gendered Power Relations among Women: A Study of Household Decision-Making in Lesbian Stepfamilies.”American Sociological Review, 73, 2: 335-356.

Moore, Mignon R. 2006. “Lipstick or Timberlands?  Meanings of Gender Presentation in Black Lesbian Communities.”  SIGNS:  Journal of Women in Culture and Society, 32, 1: 113-139.

Tey Meadow

Tey Meadow

UNI: 
tm2846
Tey
Meadow
Assistant Professor of Sociology
Phone: 
+1 212 853 1341
Campus Phone: 
MS 3-1341
Department: 
Department of Sociology
401410X
Room: 
617
Office Hours: 
by appointment
606 West 122nd St, Knox Hall, Mail Code: 9649,United States
Areas of Interest: 
Gender, Sexuality, Law, Classifications

Andreas Wimmer

Andreas Wimmer

UNI: 
aw2951
kw2510@columbia.edu
Andreas
Wimmer
Lieber Professor of Sociology and Political Philosophy
Department: 
Sociology
Room: 
605 Knox Hall
Office Hours: 
By Appointment
Areas of Specialty: 
Comparative Historical Sociology, Theory, Research Design, Social Networks, Culture

Dan J. Wang

Dan J. Wang

UNI: 
djw2104
Dan
Wang
Assistant Professor of Business
Phone: 
+1 212 854 3401
Campus Phone: 
MS 4-3401
Department: 
Business^Management
511040X
101 Uris, United States

Van C. Tran

Van C. Tran

UNI: 
vct2105
vct2105@columbia.edu
Van
Tran
Assistant Professor of Sociology
Campus Phone: 
212-854-4115
Department: 
Sociology
Room: 
607 Knox Hall
Office Hours: 
Wednesdays by appointment.
OFFICE ADDRESS: 607 Knox Hall, 606 W. 122nd St., New York, NY 10027
Areas of Interest: 
Immigration, Race and Ethnicity, Urban Poverty, Social Inequality, Public Policy, Population Health
Education: 

Ph.D., Harvard, 2011

Biographical Note: 

Van C. Tran is a sociologist whose primary research focuses on the incorporation of post-1965 immigrants and their children as well as its implications for the future of ethnic and racial inequality in the United States. His other research interests include neighborhoods, urban inequality, and population health, with a focus on the Hispanic/Latino population and New York City neighborhoods. Some of his recent work also adopts a comparative approach to the study of migration in the United States, in Europe, and in China. For more information, see his personal website. For recent updates, see News.

Courses offered Fall 2017:

Fall 2017: Senior Thesis Seminar (Undergraduate)

Fall 2017: Qualitative Social Analysis (Graduate)

Fall 2017: Race, Ethnicity, and Migration Workshop

Office hours Fall 2017:

Please sign up here.

Publications: 

For a full list, see Publications.

Jennifer C. Lena

Jennifer C. Lena

UNI: 
jcl42
jcl42@columbia.edu
Jennifer
Lena
Associate Professor
Fax: 
212.678.4048
Campus Phone: 
212.678.3271
Room: 
413B Zankel Hall
Areas of Specialty: 
Culture, Organizations, Elites, Stratification
Biographical Note: 

Jennifer C. Lena is Associate Professor of Arts Administration at Teachers College, Columbia University and has a courtesy appointment in the Department of Sociology. She is co-editor (with Frederick Wherry and Greta Hsu) of a book series, Culture and Economic Life, published by Stanford University Press. She is also co-editor of the journal Poetics. Lena currently serves on the Editorial Boards of Contemporary Sociology and Sociology Compass. She is past Chair of the Sociology of Culture Section of the American Sociological Association.

Lena is a past fellow of the Center for Arts and Cultural Policy Studies at Princeton University, and the Curb Center for Arts, Enterprise, and Public Policy at Vanderbilt University, and held faculty positions at Vanderbilt University and Barnard College. Her research focuses on understanding processes of classification, particularly the organizational and institutional conditions for the creation, modification, or elimination of cultural categories like genres. Lena also examines non-profit executive transitions and organizational closure, particularly in the visual and performing arts, and service organizations. She is the author of Banding Together: How Communities Create Genres in Popular Music (Princeton University Press, 2012), which was named one of Choice Reviews Outstanding Academic Titles for 2012Her research has been published in the American Sociological Review, Social Forces, Poetics, and American Behavioral Scientist, among other peer-reviewed journals, and has been reprinted in texts dedicated to highlighting excellence in social science methods, hip-hop scholarship, and the sociology of culture. Lena is reputed to be the first sociologist to commission a Grammy-nominated album: Hilos (composer: Gabriela Frank; performed by ALIAS Chamber Ensemble; released in 2010 by Naxos Records). Her current projects include a study of the increasingly broad and diverse tastes of U.S. elites, provisionally titled, Entitled

Publications: 

Representative examples from each research stream in the past several years:

Lena, Jennifer C. 2012. Banding Together: How Communities Create Genres in Popular Music. Princeton University Press.

Lena, Jennifer C. and Erin Johnston. 2015. “U.S. Cultural Engagement with Global Muslim Communities: Contours and Connections in an Emerging Field.” Grantmakers in the Arts Reader. Vol. 26 (1): 9-13.

Lena, Jennifer C. 2015. “Culture, Production of: Prospects for the Twenty-First Century.” International Encyclopedia of the Social and Behavioral Sciences. 2nd Edition. Section Ed. Kees van Rees; Ed. in Chief, James Wright. Elsevier. Pp. 608-613.

Lena, Jennifer C. and Danielle Lindemann. 2014. “Who is an Artist? New Data for an Old Question.” Poetics. Special issue: Art at the Crossroads. Ed. Victoria Alexander and Anne Bower. Vol. 43: 70-85.

Lena, Jennifer C. 2014. “Making It Work: The Education and Employment of Recent Arts Graduates.” Annual Report on the 2013 Strategic National Arts Alumni Project (SNAAP). With Sally Gaskill, Rebecca F. Houghton, Amber Lambert, Angie Miller, and Steven J. Tepper. Pp. 1-30.

Lena, Jennifer C. January/February 2013. “A Visit From The Credibility Squad.” Pacific Standard. Pgs. 32-35.

Lena, Jennifer C. 2011. “Tradition and Transformation at the Fan Fair Festival.” Pp. 224-248 in Negotiating Values in the Creative Industries: Fairs, Festivals and Competitive Events, ed. Brian Moeran and Jesper Strandgaard Pedersen. Cambridge University Press.

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