Dialika Sall

Dialika Sall

Dissertation

Race, Ethnicity and the Children of West African Immigrants

Dissertation Review Committee

Bio

I am a Ph.D student in Sociology and a Paul F. Lazarsfeld Fellow at Columbia University. My research interests include immigration, race and ethnicity, urban sociology, education and qualitative methods. I am currently studying integration experiences and identity negotiations among the children of West African immigrants in New York City. My research is supported by the National Science Foundation’s (NSF) Graduate Research Fellowship Program and the NSF Doctoral Dissertation Research Improvement Award. Prior to Columbia, I graduated from Pomona College in 2012 with a B.A. in Sociology. My senior thesis examined the work experiences of Senegalese hair braiders in New York City and Atlanta, Georgia. I have also worked in youth development programs, including 3 years as an Academic Associate at Highbridge Voices in the Bronx and 1 year with Americorps-City Year as a tutor and mentor at Harper High School in Chicago.

Education

  • 2017 M.Phil Sociology, Columbia University
  • 2015 M.A. Sociology, Columbia University
  • 2012 B.A. Sociology Pomona College

Publications

  • Sall, Dialika. Review of “Beyond Expectations: Second-Generation Nigerians in the United States and Britain” by Onoso Imoagene (University of California Press 2017) in Sociological Forum (Forthcoming 2018).
  • Sall, Dialika and Shamus R. Khan. 2017. “What Elite Theory Should Have Learned, and Can Still Learn, From W.E.B. DuBois.” Ethnic and Racial Studies 40(3):512-514.

Teaching

  • 2018- Instructor for “Immigrant New York", Columbia University-Department of Sociology
  • 2017- Instructor for “Sociology of Race and Ethnicity", Columbia University-Department of Sociology
  • 2015- Teaching Assistant for “Work and Gender” with Professor Teresa Sharpe, Columbia University-Department of Sociology
  • 2014- Teaching Assistant for “Organizing Innovation” with Professor David Stark, Columbia University-Department of Sociology